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Passengers & SLF (Self Loading Freight) If you are regularly a passenger on any airline then why not post your questions here?

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Old 15th Oct 2017, 16:44   #61 (permalink)
 
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Paxboy. If it does move on it will only be to change the order. It will be 'my bonus first', shareholders - whatever, staff and customers - what are those?
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Old 16th Oct 2017, 07:37   #62 (permalink)
 
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Hmmm. Take a look at the Ryanair thread here:
Ryanair uses all the runway.
If so many pilots are unable to agree on how to successfully drive a 737 and where and when to actually take off, what chance a computer getting it right every time?
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Old 16th Oct 2017, 09:25   #63 (permalink)
 
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that is the point of ourse "so many pilots unable to agree"

A machine will do the same every time........................
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Old 16th Oct 2017, 13:55   #64 (permalink)
 
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Originally Posted by KelvinD View Post
Hmmm. Take a look at the Ryanair thread here:
Ryanair uses all the runway.
If so many pilots are unable to agree on how to successfully drive a 737 and where and when to actually take off, what chance a computer getting it right every time?
Well, about 100%, if it has been programmed correctly.
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Old 16th Oct 2017, 17:15   #65 (permalink)
 
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Assuming the environment doesn't violate the assumptions made by the programmers.
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Old 16th Oct 2017, 18:18   #66 (permalink)
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Yes, my first thought was 'Sudden rain squall that contaminates the runway'. But the landside human responsible (be it local for a remote airfield or at a large hub) will then tell the computers about the change in take off / landing parameters and the contamination and it'll all be wonderful.
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Old 17th Oct 2017, 11:59   #67 (permalink)
 
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It'll be automated - pick it off from an automated electronic ATIS system

And sensors wiil check you ARE accelerarating/de-accelerating properly
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Old 17th Oct 2017, 15:18   #68 (permalink)
 
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Ah yes, the ATIS with the AUTO-METAR such as in use at Heathrow, spewing out '///CB' whatever the hell that is? Never any CB around, yet always published.
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Old 17th Oct 2017, 15:53   #69 (permalink)
 
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So you don't actually need to hack the drone to bring it down -- it's enough to hack automated weather information or its sensor system.
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Old 17th Oct 2017, 16:09   #70 (permalink)
 
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Thinking about it I can see the pressure coming from 3 directions:-

1. The military are already looking at drones/unmanned aircraft to deliver supplies over significant distances - that will no doubt include R&D against hacking...... and if they can do it?

2. Amazon etc are looking at delivery by drones - so that leads to scaling up - packages, then van loads, then truck loads......

3. Airline management want a more uniform, controled and lower cost operation

It's going to happen I think - and maybe sooner than we expect......... after Mr B introduces the MoMA it's going to be hard for airframers/engine manufacturers to keep reducing costs by 15% per design iteration and single manned/unmanned will be an obvious way forward
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Old 17th Oct 2017, 17:16   #71 (permalink)
 
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"looking at delivery by drones" makes for good PR, doesn't mean it's going to happen, or that it's even close to ready
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Old 18th Oct 2017, 08:49   #72 (permalink)
 
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well it's in trials.................
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Old 18th Oct 2017, 11:40   #73 (permalink)
 
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Flying cars are in trials. Just because something is in trials doesn't mean it is close to being a reality (doesn't mean its not either of course.)
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Old 18th Oct 2017, 14:53   #74 (permalink)
 
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Originally Posted by Tray Surfer View Post
Never, I hope. As, once again, humans seem hell bent on doing them selves out of a job.
No, what humans want is not to be held hostage by other humans having an argument with another human and themselves becoming a casualty.

e.g. train driver and employer in dispute - its the travelling public who suffer the most inconvenience and they are not a party to the dispute.

Automate train operation like the vast number of metro's in the world and thats one more self-entitled, overpaid train driver put of the loop.

Although like you, I doubt that aircraft will be fully automated in this century as a train can coast to a stop safely in most circumstances whereas the end state for any significant aircraft failure is 'death of passengers'.
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Old 18th Oct 2017, 19:59   #75 (permalink)
 
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https://jrupprechtlaw.com/amazon-dro...azon-prime-air
Quote:
Conclusion:

Many have written on this topic because they see the technology taking off. They see the progress in the technology that many have made and assume that drone delivery will be allowed soon. They get the “West Coast” mindset where they think if enough money and technology are thrown at the problem, it will be fixed regardless of the law. Additionally, most writing on or marketing drone delivery do not understand all the legal issues.

Aviation is an “East Coast” industry where the laws out of D.C. will heavily influence the business. Aviation is an extremely regulated environment. The faster the companies operating in this area realize that fact, the better off they will be so that they can actually do these types of operations.

Amazon still has a long way to go before drone delivery can be experienced in real life by the American public, not just as a short clip on the internet.


XKCD (Randall Munroe, CC BY-NC 2.5): "Crowdsourced steering" doesn't sound quite as appealing as "self driving."

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Old 19th Oct 2017, 17:20   #76 (permalink)
 
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" what humans want is not to be held hostage by other humans having an argument with another human and themselves becoming a casualty."

most humans want a flight that's as cheap as possible IMHO
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Old 19th Oct 2017, 17:56   #77 (permalink)
 
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Most humans have never set foot in an aeroplane, nor will.
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Old 19th Oct 2017, 22:31   #78 (permalink)
 
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The world need a buss-sized drone that can replace short flights, specially for transport across water. A passenger drone travelling around 200 km/hr could easily outcompete commercial airlines where flight time for a jet is 1 hour or less due to a drone could take off and land from small spaces near a parking lot with more convenient locations than an airport.

I see a drone with:
- About 4 electrically driven propeller pods each side of a bus shaped body.
- 2 petrol engines to create the power, with separate fuel tanks for security.
- Batteries to boost power at takeoff and enough capacity to land safely if engines cut out.
- Each side would have separate controls for 2+2 pods, so if 1 set cut out the drone could still land safely.
- If landing on water the whole unit would be kept floating by airbags.
- Completely automated flight but a single attendant for safety and to control that eveybody has a ticket and handle unruliness.
- Remotely but cable connected pre-programmed flight destination to avoid possible hijackings.
- Flight controlled by gps, safety by radar and lidar.
- l@ser based ground scan to find safe emergency landing spots.
- Around 50 passengers per drone for versatility and about 5-7 tons payload.
- Price for each unit would need to be in the Euro 500k to 1 million bracket to be competitive.

Public interest and safety would be satisfied by the buss-drones beeing owned by regulated entities, and production and maintenance could be strictly controlled. A separate commercial drone-buss flying zone could be regulated for around 500-1000 meters above ground level.
A nicer interior "private jet" version of the drone could be developed to replace helicopters and increase the market. Commuter routes into traffic congested city-centers is another market.
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Old 20th Oct 2017, 08:26   #79 (permalink)
 
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Short flights are only attractive if you can essentially turn up and go - as with a car or a train. When you have to arrive 90 minutes before the flight and go through all the security hassle they become unattractive. Plus of course the airport doesn't make any money unless they can trap you in the shopping arcade

Short range Bus Drones might work but only if they can operate like a bus - ie independent of large fixed airfields, security etc etc
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Old 20th Oct 2017, 14:06   #80 (permalink)
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vikingivesterled View Post
- Around 50 passengers per drone for versatility and about 5-7 tons payload.

- Price for each unit would need to be in the Euro 500k to 1 million bracket to be competitive.

...and production and maintenance could be strictly controlled.
The size together with the production & maintenance requirement appear to contradict the price bracket. For example, have a look at the new cost of a 53 seater coach (Euro 300k+).

The problem with quadcopter-type drones when scaled up, is the velocity and noise of the downwash. When V-22 Ospreys were sent to help after the Nepal earthquake, they were rapidly withdrawn when it was found their downwash just added to the destruction.
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