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Old 12th Oct 2017, 08:40   #41 (permalink)
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
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GOOD ATTITUDE!!!! And a strong desire to learn.

A freshly issued CPL is only an authorisation to learn in my opinion. Having failed a few flight tests and nearly killing myself more than once in an aeroplane due to inexperience and bad judgements mainly associated with weather amongst big mountains, I am still of the view that I’m a junior pilot with 5 logbooks. The logbooks are for my kids and my hours in them mean nothing. My experience is what counts and that shows in any check that I do and any good instructor or examiner can always quickly determine the difference between the experience and lack of recency.
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Old 12th Oct 2017, 09:59   #42 (permalink)
Man Bilong Balus long PNG
 
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Having failed a few flight tests and nearly killing myself more than once in an aeroplane due to inexperience and bad judgements mainly associated with weather amongst big mountains,
Em nau, Duck Pilot. Been there, done that and tossed out the soiled 'Reg Grundies' afterwards as proof!

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A freshly issued CPL is only an authorisation to learn
A fair description.

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GOOD ATTITUDE!!!! And a strong desire to learn.
With, if I may suggest, ever so slightly more stress on the latter part of that statement than the former.
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Old 12th Oct 2017, 18:11   #43 (permalink)
 
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Originally Posted by Clare Prop View Post
Indeed, all very good points

My point was, the flying schools should be guiding people how to be employable once they have the CPL rather than just say "go to (insert town here) and hang around and see what happens" I think a lot of them give the studes unrealistic expectations and that leads to this kind of disappointment later on or their instructors don't have any experience of looking for this kind of work.

There is a big difference between schools and how work-ready their graduates are.
Unfortunately a instructors at most flying schools who have worked in proper charter organisations are few and far between. So I'd have to agree with HB there that your parents job to prepare you properly. A flying school shouldn't need to teach someone a strong work ethic.

Just my 2 cents.
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Old 12th Oct 2017, 21:01   #44 (permalink)
 
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Originally Posted by Clare Prop View Post
Indeed, all very good points

My point was, the flying schools should be guiding people how to be employable once they have the CPL rather than just say "go to (insert town here) and hang around and see what happens" I think a lot of them give the studes unrealistic expectations and that leads to this kind of disappointment later on or their instructors don't have any experience of looking for this kind of work.

There is a big difference between schools and how work-ready their graduates are.
.

This is a good point. Most flying schools are still adverting the great pilot shortage and giving students the idea that they will work for virgin/qf if they complete their training with them.

Also I believe some people just aren't cut out for GA. I've met some really switched on pilots however they seem to be missing initiative, and they really struggled in GA and then gave up, some are more suited to a Cadetship.
Anyone can get a CPL, it takes something special to get and maintain work.
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Old 12th Oct 2017, 22:35   #45 (permalink)
 
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their instructors don't have any experience of looking for this kind of work
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Unfortunately a instructors at most flying schools who have worked in proper charter organisations are few and far between.
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some people just aren't cut out for GA. I've met some really switched on pilots however they seem to be missing initiative
Yes... yes.... and yes.

Working in GA takes a bit of nous and common sense. The types of person who thrives in GA and go on to an airline career was pretty common in the 70s/80s/90s but I think they are increasingly finding different career paths these days.
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