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Old 5th Jan 2011, 22:49   #81 (permalink)
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
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The requirement for holding a first class medical is in the FAA FSIMS, the updated version of the inspectors handbook.

ELIGIBILITY FOR THE ATP WRITTEN (KNOWLEDGE) TEST. Test examiners administer aeronautical knowledge tests in written form or by computer. Since these tests can be administered by both means, they will be referred to as knowledge tests. Before an applicant may take the airline transport pilot (ATP) knowledge examination, however, an inspector must establish that the applicant is eligible for the requested certification in either the airplane or rotorcraft category. Except for age, applicants must meet all eligibility requirements before being authorized to the ATP knowledge test or being issued a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Form 8060-7, Airman’s Authorization for Written Test. Inspectors should use either the job aid entitled, “ATP-Knowledge Qualifications Job Aid-Airplane” or “ATP-Knowledge Qualifications Job Aid-Helicopter,” as applicable, to complete this task (see Figures 5-110 and 5-109). The eligibility requirements for the ATP certificate are printed in an abbreviated form on the job aid. The following is an expanded discussion of the eligibility requirements.

A. An applicant must submit documentary evidence to show at least one of the following acceptable pilot qualifications:

·An FAA commercial pilot certificate,
·A commercial or ATP certificate (without limitation) issued by an International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) country, or
·Evidence of United States (U.S.) military pilot qualification within the past 12 calendar-months (such as aeronautical orders or flight time logs).
B. An applicant must process a current first class medical certificate.

C. An applicant must be a high school graduate or the equivalent. ...

D. An applicant must be able to read, write, and understand the English language. ...

E. An applicant must be of good moral character. ...

F. An applicant must have accumulated the flight experience required for the appropriate category rating before taking the knowledge examination. Each applicant must submit logbooks or other equivalent documents for an inspector to verify the flight experience. ...


Since Silver Knapper is getting a business jet type, he won't be "exercising the privileges" of an ATP and so will only need a second class medical.
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Old 6th Jan 2011, 06:16   #82 (permalink)
 
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Any help converting a mexican ATPL to FAA ATPL

Hi MarkerInbound,

I´m a mexican pilot with over 10,000hrs currently flying the B737-NG,
I just became a US resident (w/greencard) ,could you tell me, how to start the process of converting my licence and be able to work in the states.

thanks
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Old 6th Jan 2011, 19:31   #83 (permalink)
 
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Hola Mayan,

Based on your Mexican license, the FAA will grant you a PVT certificate and if you take the "Instrument Foreign Pilot" written test you will have an Instrument rating on the PVT certificate. And they will put the B-737 rating on it but again, only at the PVT level. That doesn't do you much good looking for a job. Normally you must hold a FAA PVT before you get a FAA COMM and a FAA COMM before you get an FAA ATP. Holding a foreign COMM or ATP does allow you to skip the FAA PVT and COMM and go straight to the ATP. In addition, as the holder of a foreign ATP, you are not required to have an instructor's sign off to take the checkride. So you still need a FAA medical, you'll need to take the ATP knowledge test (written) and pass a checkride. If you take the check in an Aztec (I had to use that example), you will get an ATP MEL. If you take the check in a 737 sim, you will get an ATP MEL B-737.

In the US, there is only one 737 rating that covers the 100 to 900. There are several training centers that do 737 training (I do work for one on the side but not in the 737 program.) I think they all do the basic rating in a 200 and then add on a NG differences program for those who want it. The basic rating cost around 7-8000 dollars. You should not need a full course being current on the airplane. I think you'd fall under "Upgrade" training, 4 or 5 classroom days and 3 or 4 sims v. 2 weeks and 6 sims. So it should be a bit cheaper. Or just do it in an Aztec, that should not be over 2000 dollars.
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Old 7th Jan 2011, 07:19   #84 (permalink)
 
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Hi ,

By any chance, do you have the name and phone number of the person in charge of the B737 program in the training center that you work?
And do you think they will be able to help me completing the process of converting my ATPL.
I will take the FAA medical and the ATP knowledge test (written) and problably do the checkride in a 737 sim,even i would do the ground school and the sim sesions,if i need it.
However do you think ,i should do the verification of authenticity of a foreign license,rating and medical certification to start the process?

Thanks for your reply and your help.

Mayan
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Old 7th Jan 2011, 21:31   #85 (permalink)
 
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"However do you think ,i should do the verification of authenticity of a foreign license,rating and medical certification to start the process?"

Transport Canada and the FAA have a bilateral agreement/procedure to recognise each others licence to some extent. The first step required is to get a "verification of authenticity" sent to Oklahoma City. I would assume that would also be a required step from Mexico.
cheers
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Old 8th Jan 2011, 00:57   #86 (permalink)
 
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Mayan, I sent a private message so it doesn't sound like I'm advertising for the part time job.

R. Barry - I don't know if he needs to start the verification process or not. He is not going to have the Mexican license converted to a FAA certificate but only use it to cut out a couple steps in getting a regular FAA certificate. Probably the best bet is to call the Airman Certification Branch in OKC.
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Old 15th Jan 2011, 16:34   #87 (permalink)
 
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Guys

Thanks for the advice, very grateful.

Here goes.........!!

SK
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Old 15th Jan 2011, 23:09   #88 (permalink)
 
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Hi,

I´m sending my papers to the FAA this week for verification.
Thank´s for your help guys ,hope to see you soon.

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Old 1st Mar 2011, 03:06   #89 (permalink)
 
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Hi

I have just completed the process of gaining the FAA ATP on the basis of my JAA one. It is a stand alone unrestricted.
I have just stumbled upon a problem. I assumed that all ratings on my JAA one would transfer. But apparently this is only on the restricted ones.
I have all the types I need and MEL thanks to my checkride. But I need a SEL rating also, which I apparently need to do a check ride for.
Is this correct? It is only for private purposes, I don't need an ATP SEL. But I have been told this is the easiest route for me to go down from here.

I have this current on my JAA licence.

Any ideas gratefully received.

Many Thanks
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Old 24th Mar 2011, 08:28   #90 (permalink)
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Australia
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Dear all,

I am completely confused with this FAA conversion business and I am humbly requesting someone to offer me some advice.

I am a low-hour JAA CPL/IR holder with ME and have completed all my JAA ATPL exams. I have been offered the possibility of flying a N-registered business jet. As such I need to get an FAA pilot certificate. I have the following questions:

a. Am I right in saying that I do not need to sit for an ATP written exam since I have less than 1500HRS total time? If so, do I still need to sit for any written exams?

b. As the business jet is owned by a private company and not used for scheduled commercial operations, will I be able to log PIC hours even without an ATP?

c. My JAA instrument and multiengine ratings are about to expire. Must I renew the ratings before I can convert my JAA licence to an FAA certificate?

d. Once I convert to an FAA certificate, will it be a stand alone FAA certificate? Or will it be based on my JAA CPL/IR?

Many thanks for your advice!
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Old 25th Mar 2011, 16:01   #91 (permalink)
 
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Where are you going to fly the plane? The FAA will allow you to fly a N registered aircraft in Australia on your Australian license. If it is going to be outside Oz, then yes, you will need a FAA certificate.

The ATP is only required for air carrier operations. To be paid to fly a privately operated aircraft, you only need a commercial certificate. In order to log PIC time, since all turbo jet aircraft require a type rating, you'd need a type rating in that type A/C.

In order to get a FAA commercial certificate, you must hold a FAA private certificate. The FAA will only grant you a PVT based on your JAA license. Here's where it gets tricky. You can can a FAA private MEL with just a lot of paper shuffling. Or you can just get a normal FAA private cert., written test, flight training and checkride. To add instrument privileges to a "based on" cert. you can either just pass a written (knowledge) test or complete the normal training program.

If you use the "based on" PVT to get your COMM, whatever license it is based on has to be current when you apply for the COMM. The FAA guidelines say if you complete the "normal" instrument training it is good when you upgrade your certificates. I don't see anything covering what happens if you just pass the Instrument Foreign Pilot written.

I'd say you have two paths. You can let the JAA lapse and do a normal FAA PVT, INST and COMM+type rating if you're looking for the PIC time. Or you can keep the JAA valid, but I think you'd still want the do the normal INST and then you'd still have to do the normal, stand alone COMM and type.
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Old 28th Mar 2011, 21:19   #92 (permalink)


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I have a slightly different situation and was wondering if anyone can help shed some light on the process for me. I keep getting different answers on this!

I currently am living in the US but am a British citizen. I have a current JAA fATPL and an FAA single cpl/IR. I want to bring my FAA license in line with my JAA by adding the ME/IR. My understanding is I should be able to go to an FAA FSDO and they can issue a restricted license that will give ME privileges on a private certificate, then I take a check ride to have the full ME/CPL/IR. But when I spoke to my FSDO today they found this very confusing!
The reason I'm asking is because when I go to add the ME to my existing FAA license with a training provider, if I have the restricted license I can presumably log the ME time as pilot in command. If it in fact turns out I have to get my JAA license verified and spend 45-90 days waiting, I might as well just book straight in to do the ME course and just log the time as P/ut.

Thanks,

Andrew.
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Old 2nd Apr 2011, 16:23   #93 (permalink)
 
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Location: Grand Junction, CO, USA
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Quote:
The requirement for holding a first class medical is in the FAA FSIMS, the updated version of the inspectors handbook.
The section quoted is for ATP applicants engaged in operations under Part 121, 135 or 91 Subpart K. For the life of me I cannot figure out why they have that section in there since there is NO regulatory requirement to have any level of medical certification for any knowledge test, regardless of whether you're engaged in Part 121/135/91K operations or not. When we had first-time ATP applicants at my 121 carrier, all we would suggest they do is go get their written done at a testing center prior to their checkride. My thought is it is old and outdated guidance that has not been removed/changed yet.

The FAA knowledge test pre-requisites can be found at 14 CFR 61.35 and are very basic: An instructor endorsement (if required for the certificate/rating you are testing for and there is NO INSTRUCTOR ENDORSEMENT required for an ATP written per 14 CFRR 61.153) and a valid photo ID.

FAA knowledge tests are generally administered at a computerized testing center. To take the ATP written all I did was register and provide ID when I showed up. No one asked for logbooks or medical certificates or anything and I'v never heard of anything like that happening.

When there is a discrepancy between the regulations and FAA guidance, the regulations always trump. FSIMS is not regulatory and is meant to guide FAA Inspectors in the performance of their jobs.
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Old 2nd Apr 2011, 16:45   #94 (permalink)
 
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Andrew,

Unfortunately 14 CFR 61.75(b)(3) prohibits the issuance of a Private Pilot Certificate on the basis of a foreign pilot license to someone who already holds a US Pilot Certificate (other than a student pilot certificate).
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Old 2nd Apr 2011, 17:26   #95 (permalink)
 
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alberttky,

Since you are a low-hours CPL/IR (which I read to mean you do not have anywhere near close to 1500 hours) then there is little point in doing an ATP written since you would not be eligible for an ATP certificate based on your low hours. So here's what you need to do:

1. Apply to the FAA for a Private Pilot Certificate on the basis of your JAA CPL/IR. (You mention your IR/ME are about to expire...don't worry about that. In order to fly as a job in that N-reg jet you need a FAA Commercial Pilot Certificate. As a result you will need to do both a full FAA IR and a ME rating at the commercial level in order to get to where you want to be.

2. Ask the training provider who is going to conduct your type rating training if they can also provide the training/testing for a Commercial Pilot Certificate and Instrument Rating. If they say yes, you're all set. You'll complete their training program including the required writtens and practicals and you'll end up with a Commercial Pilot Certificate with Instrument Rating and Type Rating for your jet.

3. If they say no...you will need to find an instructor/school that will train you for the Commercial Pilot maneuvers and check your Instrument Proficiency and knowledge meets the level required by the FAA. I would do this in a single engine airplane for cost purposes (when you do the type rating you'll get a multi-engine rating along the way). That instructor will also endorse you to take the writtens.

4. Take the full Instrument written test (NOT INSTRUMENT FOREIGN PILOT).

5. Take the Commercial Pilot written test.

6. Take the Commercial Pilot practical and Instrument practical tests.

7. Go to your type rating training provider with your new Commercial/Instrument certificate and they will train you for the multi and type rating.
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Old 2nd Apr 2011, 17:44   #96 (permalink)
 
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Silverknapper,

There is no such thing as an FAA ATP issued on the basis of a JAA ATPL. You may have used your JAA ATPL to meet the pre-requisite of a US Commercial Pilot certificate (as allowed by 14 CFR 61.153(d)(3)), but your FAA ATP was issued on the basis of you meeting all the requirements for the FAA ATP, including a written and practical test, along with meeting all the aeronautical experience requirements.

It sounds like you did your ATP practical in a multi-engine airplane, so you would have a FAA ATP with a Multi-Engine Land Rating. You would have no single engine privileges at all since you have never demonstrated your single engine prowess to the FAA. In order to fly a single engine airplane in the US (even at the private pilot level) you will have to take a checkride in one at any of the private pilot, commercial pilot or ATP levels (your choice).

And if you're thinking about getting a FAA Private Pilot certificate on the basis of your JAA ATPL with single-engine privileges, you're out of luck, since you already hold a U.S. pilot certificate they will not let you do that.
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Old 5th Apr 2011, 16:20   #97 (permalink)
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Milan
Age: 36
Posts: 73
Any A320 SIM FAA Approved + Examiner in Europe??

Hi Everybody¡¡

Any A320 FFS FAA Approved in Europe? Does anybody know a FAA ATP Examiner on the A320 also in europe???????

Want to obtain the FAA ATP, i passed the FAA ATP theoretical exam at Flight Safety-Dassault headquarters in Le Bourget 15 days ago, and now i´m planning to perform the sim check for the A320 endorsement + atp.
I have just received some info from Panam center located in Miami, but the price is to high.

I´ve got also the FAA PPL based on my JAA license and the letter of authentification of foreign license updated, also the FAA Class 1 medical.

I have JAA Full ATPL + A320 type, 4500 hours total time.

Any idea about the possibility to make the practical test in Europe????

Please post me ASAP¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡
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Old 1st Sep 2011, 14:17   #98 (permalink)
 
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Exclamation FAA will allow Conversions effective 31/10/2011

The U.S. FARs are changing on 31/10/2011. The many changes include allowing conversion of foreign commercial and ATPL certificates for ICAO member countries with a BASA agreement with the U.S.

Read here for summary of conversion changes

Complete document here with all FAR changes

I don't know anymore than what I posted above. Here is the actual change to 61.71(c):

Quote:
§ 61.71 Graduates of an approved training program other than under this part: Special rules.
* * * * *
(c) A person who holds a foreign pilot license and is applying for an equivalent U.S. pilot certificate on the basis of a Bilateral Aviation Safety Agreement and associated Implementation Procedures for Licensing is considered to have met the applicable aeronautical experience, aeronautical knowledge, and areas of operation requirements of this part.

Last edited by Check 6; 1st Sep 2011 at 14:45.
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Old 12th Sep 2011, 15:27   #99 (permalink)
 
Join Date: May 2000
Location: Sussex
Posts: 79
Help Please

Hi all

I have spent many hours going through threads here and getting 'please contact your local FSDO' responses from the FAA.

Does anyone know who to contact to get the official procedure to enable me to have an FAA ATP issued?

I have a UK issued JAA ATPL. I am doing a new type rating and want to use that to get an FAA ATP to complete the set, so to speak!

Many thanks

Ballast!
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Old 12th Sep 2011, 19:09   #100 (permalink)
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Texas
Posts: 1,152
Ballast,

It's all in Part 61 of our regulations:

61.153 Eligibility requirements: General.
To be eligible for an airline transport pilot certificate, a person must:
(a) Be at least 23 years of age;
(b) Be able to read, speak, write, and understand the English language. ...
(c) Be of good moral character;
(d) Meet at least one of the following requirements:
(1)
(2)
(3) Holds either a foreign airline transport pilot license with instrument privileges, or a foreign commercial pilot license with an instrument rating, that—
(i) Was issued by a contracting State to the Convention on International Civil Aviation; and
(ii) Contains no geographical limitations.
(e) Meet the aeronautical experience requirements of this subpart
(f) Pass a knowledge test on the aeronautical knowledge areas of §61.155
(g) Pass the practical test on the areas of operation listed in §61.157

You do the written test and you take a checkride. The checkride can be the type ride. This is all as of now. While the rules change the end of October, the only country we have a BASA with that allows issuing pilot certificates is Canada and it took 6 years to work that deal out.

Last edited by MarkerInbound; 12th Sep 2011 at 19:11. Reason: formatting
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