PPRuNe Forums


Military Aviation A forum for the professionals who fly military hardware. Also for the backroom boys and girls who support the flying and maintain the equipment, and without whom nothing would ever leave the ground. All armies, navies and air forces of the world equally welcome here.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 11th Jul 2008, 20:24   #141 (permalink)
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: LIVERPOOL
Age: 94
Posts: 401
Sorry Paddy, for mistaking you for George. Just put it down to PRE senile dementia. Can't remember why i have gone into the bathroom sometimes.
cliffnemo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12th Jul 2008, 16:54   #142 (permalink)
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: LIVERPOOL
Age: 94
Posts: 401
Having been familiarized with the aircraft we then progressed to do circuits and bumps, as we called them, but our instructors referred to them as landings and arrivals This to me was the most difficult of all the exercises to perfect, and even more difficult at night.
At night we only had a "Christmas tree" and goose neck flares to land by , and although the A.T 6s were fitted with landing lights we were not allowed to use them.
The Christmas tree consisted of a box emitting a red , green, and yellow beam. If you could see the yellow beam you were too high. the green beam just right and the red beam Our father which art ****.

The goose necks were positioned about fifty feet apart ( alright then fifteen meters, ) They appeared further apart when we were higher up and almost in line when on the ground, This was the only method we could use to judge our height.

The approach to the airfield , and the circuit were demonstrated by Mr Dux, and also explained in the classroom a diagram of this hopefully will appear below.
One of the problems of following the instructions was that when we reached the cross wind leg we had to judge at what point we throttled back, so that we could glide to the touch down point just over the boundary of the field. However , after a few attempts and overshoots this was soon mastered. The next problem was bringing the aircraft down to within a few feet of the ground before pulling the stick back and "stalling out" again soon mastered, but only after a few arrivals.

A point of interest. Although most circuits both in the U.K and U.S.A ran anticlockwise, some of the circuits in the U.K ran clockwise when two airfields were close together. In Lincolnshire, (Lancasters) and Yorkshire (Halifaxes) some were very close together.

Take off was "a piece of cake". Just open the throttle, hold the stick back and build up speed, ease forward until the tail came up, , and then ease the stick back. Night or day, no problem.

More Latin.
Flight mechs motto. Ubendum we mendum.


cliffnemo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 14th Jul 2008, 16:29   #143 (permalink)
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: LIVERPOOL
Age: 94
Posts: 401
Sorry for more "duff gen" but the pic above should be entitled Checking wind. Below is a pic of the airfield circuit.


Another pic to show I didn't spend all the war in training. Cliffnemo on right, but photo for some reason is a mirror view. We should all be on the Port side. Note flying boots, brown suede sheepies had been withdrawn, and black escape boots issued. These had a knife inside for cutting off the tops , leaving just black boots. The original brown suede boots soon pushed out the back of the boot and became awkward to walk in. Will continue with our training antics next to include spins and stalling training.
MNEMONIC Port is red, but never left on the table. We always used port and starboard then . Wonder if it is now left and right.?


Last edited by cliffnemo; 7th Sep 2008 at 17:16.
cliffnemo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 15th Jul 2008, 19:10   #144 (permalink)
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: LIVERPOOL
Age: 94
Posts: 401
By the end of the first week I had been instructed on the previously mentioned exercises plus, overshoot procedure, instruments, stalling ,and spinning. I had previously been instructed on spins at Cambridge, and as I have said my instructor had been a WW 1 R.F.C pilot, who told me at the time no one knew how to correct a spin and the only thing they could do if they got in to a spin ,was pray. As he taught me how to develop a spin and recover I was quite at ease when repeating the exercise at Ponca . To cause a spin we just throttled back, pulled back the stick, and rammed on full rudder. to recover , stick full forward, and apply opposite rudder.

While we were on the primary course, two advanced students took off in an A.T 6 on a night flying exercise, and didn't return. At first light we searched for them and found the crashed A.T 6 about 3 miles from the end of the runway,both pupils dead. It was later found that the fuel change over control was half way between tank 1 and tank 2. The preflight drill was to start up on tank 1, test mags, and full revs. Then taxy out on tank 2 as a test, then switch back to 1 for take off. Obviously they had taken off with just enough fuel in the carburettor to get airborne, when the engine cut out. We were all very careful when performing pre flight checks after that.The cadets were buried in Ponca City and the graves are still carefully maintained.
By the end of the first week I had had about eight hours flying tuition, and four "under the hood" on the Link trainer.



We were all issued with a Hussif, does any one know if it is still standard issue?
cliffnemo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 16th Jul 2008, 00:49   #145 (permalink)
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Yorkshire
Age: 73
Posts: 429
As far as I know, hussifs are not now issued. When #2 son entered BRNC in 1999, Mrs Ex made him one up. It was obvious he regarded it as a bit of an embarrassment, tantamount to her writing to him twice a week to remind him to wear at least one vest while at sea - until he needed to sew on a shirt button - thanks, Mum, can you do another one as everyone's borrowing it...

What happened to yours, Cliff?
exscribbler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 16th Jul 2008, 10:11   #146 (permalink)
 
Join Date: Jun 2001
Posts: 1,451
Found mine buried deep in a drawer only a month or so ago. Needles a bit rusty where gthey go through the cotton, but everything still there. I think it would have to be the only piece of original issue kit I still have in my possession, maybe because it has been so handy on more than one occasion.
Wiley is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 16th Jul 2008, 10:28   #147 (permalink)
Red On, Green On
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Between the woods and the water
Age: 18
Posts: 6,489
Quote:
When #2 son entered BRNC in 1999, Mrs Ex made him one up.
As did mine when I went in 78! Still have it.
airborne_artist is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 16th Jul 2008, 15:14   #148 (permalink)
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Yorkshire
Age: 73
Posts: 429
Wonderful things, mothers. I wish I still had mine.
exscribbler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 16th Jul 2008, 16:03   #149 (permalink)
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: LIVERPOOL
Age: 94
Posts: 401
And I thought no one would know what a hussif was.
For the people who do not know, it was a cloth roll that contained needles , cotton , darning wool , buttons, etc. Officially known as Housewife, Airmen F.T U.OF. As we were issued with only two pairs of socks if nothing else we became efficient at darning.
To EXSCRBBLER. I would imagine I had to hand my hussif in , with my Smith and Wesson .38. morphine ampoule etc, at R.A.F Warton on demob.
BUTTON STICKS.? DURAGLIT ?
Get yer knees brown.

Last edited by cliffnemo; 16th Jul 2008 at 16:41.
cliffnemo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 16th Jul 2008, 22:37   #150 (permalink)
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Yorkshire
Age: 73
Posts: 429
I was once carefully instructed in the use of the button stick by a mate from the RAF Section of our school CCF; I recall feeling so pleased that my sailor suit had no shiny bits needing regular polishing.

Duraglit? Oh yes, I remember that but it wasn't the liquid but the later impregnated wadding - I used it on my car bumpers.

You got that brevet yet, Cliff?
exscribbler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 17th Jul 2008, 08:16   #151 (permalink)
Cunning Artificer
 
Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: The spiritual home of DeHavilland
Age: 70
Posts: 3,042
Button sticks were no use if you were on your last Jankers inspection. Then you'd cut the buttons off to polish the backs to the required standard and sew them back on again. Duraglit was for civvies. Real men used Brasso.
Blacksheep is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 17th Jul 2008, 09:46   #152 (permalink)
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Yorkshire
Age: 73
Posts: 429
Naah. Real men drank Brasso.
exscribbler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 17th Jul 2008, 10:58   #153 (permalink)
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: LIVERPOOL
Age: 94
Posts: 401
and malingerers drank H.P sauce. Bullexcreteras finished the polishing with Silvo. Skivers polished them once, then covered their buttons with aircraft dope, but it didn't con the searg with the beady eye. Later the top brass decided staybrite buttons were better.
Exscribbler asks You got that brevet yet, Cliff?
Why ? Have I taken longer than forty hours ?. But if I knew then I could gain a brevet in 40 hours, are even buy one on Ebay for a fiver (with Queens crown . A bit more for one with Kings crown) I would have waited.
cliffnemo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 17th Jul 2008, 13:30   #154 (permalink)
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Yorkshire
Age: 73
Posts: 429
Sorry, Cliff. I was trying to nudge us all back on thread!
exscribbler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 17th Jul 2008, 13:43   #155 (permalink)
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Location: Location!
Posts: 1,711
Naah. Real men drank Brasso.

Now now Scribes - Bluebell, not Brasso, surely!

Jack
Union Jack is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 17th Jul 2008, 14:50   #156 (permalink)
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Alconbury Weston
Age: 57
Posts: 131
Thank You

Clffnemo and bravolima80
It is so wonderful to read your reminiscences, as my dad was one of your contemporaries. He also was at Cambridge 2 ITW, Fairoaks, 18 EFTS and Heaton Park ACDC between Mar 43 and June 43; Monkton, Regina, Yorkton and Monkton July 43 to Mar 44, and was also pushed into gliders, much to his chagrin at the time, but his relief later in life. He talked of his pals who were lost during the crossing of the Rhine only once, and that was when he visited me when I was stationed at RAF Laarbruch and we visited the War Cemetery where he found their graves and wept. However, I still have his log-book and diary from Apr 44, which covers PRC, and ACOS training at Harrogate, Credenhill, and then his Glider training at Croughton in Nov 44 and Seighford in Dec 44. He then goes on to cover his time in Burma flying Dakotas on 668 and 194 Sqns and other delights such as the Aircrew Mountain Centre, Calcutta, Rangoon etc until his demob in Feb 47. Unfortunately, he passed on in 2000, but reading your words sounds exactly like him saying it. He was also reticent about sharing his experiences, always saying that no-one would be interested. I disagreed and this thread proves the interest is immense; I wish he could have been aware of the respect, interest and admiration in which your generation is held.
Thank you for making the effort to tell your story, we do appreciate it.
cynicalint is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 17th Jul 2008, 19:51   #157 (permalink)
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: LIVERPOOL
Age: 94
Posts: 401
O.K back to flying then, but no need to apologies Mr exscribbler, " I'm easy " Think it was all relevant . All comments , corrections, welcome. Any thing our nice Mr Moderator accepts is O.K by me, and it makes me think I am talking to some one.

One CYNICALINT sent me a PPRuNe email attaching the above contribution, and I asked him if he would post it to this blog. He has done, and it appears above. So thanks very much, cynicalint, much appreciated, all contributions help, yours particularly.
It seems that at times they had a surplus of pilots at Harrogate, and tried to reduce the number by forcing them to convert to gliders. If you ever get to the end of this blog, you will find out what happened to me at Harrogate. I think that when we started our training the ratio of pilots to crew was smaller. Probably more Wimpeys. Sterlings, Beaufighters, than Lancasters and Halifaxes with seven man crews.

On our second week we received flying instruction on all the previous exercises. plus instrument flying, taking off into wind, circuits, approach and landing into wind, timed medium level turns, taking off out of wind, landing out of wind, and over shoot procedure. A total of about 7hours flying. This included my first solo on the P.T 17, after nine hours dual. I also had to sign my log book to confirm I had been instructed in "action in the event of fire" and abandoning an aircraft", which was also signed by my flight instructor. I received two hours on the link trainer. We had the usual subjects in the classroom, plus memorizing about twenty ground signals composed of flags, ground markers, and the thirty m.p.h windsock.

At about this time , an Australian cadet, who appeared to be the fittest bloke in our flight, he was more than six foot in height and weighed over twelve stones, started to loose weight rapidly. The M.O attributed it to nervous tension or something similar. He did his best to build up his weight , but in the end he was unsuccessful and had to eliminate him.

Just wondering if our weekends in Ponca , our hitchhiking, being invited to a Ponca Indian powwow , etc are suitable items for this blog. ?????? Or will you insist I keep flying.???

If it moves salute it, if it doesn't paint it.
cliffnemo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 18th Jul 2008, 01:13   #158 (permalink)
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Yorkshire
Age: 73
Posts: 429




I seem to remember someone once trying Teepol...
exscribbler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 18th Jul 2008, 02:19   #159 (permalink)
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Sale, Australia
Age: 73
Posts: 3,832
Quote:
Just wondering if our weekends in Ponca , our hitchhiking, being invited to a Ponca Indian powwow , etc are suitable items for this blog.
We're all ears cliff. Although it may be difficult to believe at times, we are all adults......I think.
PS And thanks ever so for your wonderful memories.
Brian Abraham is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 18th Jul 2008, 07:56   #160 (permalink)
More bang for your buck
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: land of the clanger
Age: 75
Posts: 3,511
Quote:
Although it may be difficult to believe at times, we are all adults..
For a lot of us, in age only.
green granite is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT. The time now is 08:49.


1996-2012 The Professional Pilots Rumour Network

SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1