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Old 12th Sep 2017, 14:15   #21 (permalink)
 
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M. Mouse,

As a non-motorcyclist, one of the most dangerous habits that concerns me is a motorcycle following close behind in my blind spot. As a car driver, I try always to drive defensively but frequently find it hard to be aware of the motorcycle in my blind spot, even with well adjusted mirrors. What did your IAM instructor say about this?
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Old 12th Sep 2017, 14:49   #22 (permalink)
 
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@ Yamagata ken
Your comment "on his 16th birthday he came home on a knackered BSA Bantam. It's all been downhill since then" struck a chord with me.
My first bike, in 1965, was a clapped out Bantam - I vividly recall heating the spark plug on the kitchen gas ring to get the thing going, as it was still winter ! :-(
I only kept it for a few weeks then deserted the British motorcycle industry for Japan & got a Honda Benly (a C95 IIRC). Three more Honda's after that & finally gave up 2 wheels in 1994 when I sold my Kawasaki GPZ305. I miss biking but the weather in Scotland & the terrible standard of car drivers makes it a no-no now at my age !
I hope you're still enjoying the 650 :-)
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Old 13th Sep 2017, 14:18   #23 (permalink)
 
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Quote:
My neighbour (a surgeon and forensic pathologist - and also a motorcyclist) refers to his fellow motorcyclists as organ donors.
He's not alone. Some years ago my young son was getting patched up in hospital from a Go-Kart related crash. The surgeon in charge of the ER team glanced out of the window and noticed there was a thunderstorm starting.

"OK, You're in good shape, but I need to go now and scrub-in. The donors will be arriving soon!"

He was serious too.
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Old 13th Sep 2017, 23:00   #24 (permalink)

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Quote:
What did your IAM instructor say about this?
Essentially you do not put yourself in a position where a car/lorry/bus driver cannot see you.

Also you use a two second rule, more if it is wet or slippery, and only reduce that gap when positioning to overtake and there is a technique for doing that as well.
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Old 14th Sep 2017, 02:13   #25 (permalink)
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bergerie1 View Post
M. Mouse,

As a non-motorcyclist, one of the most dangerous habits that concerns me is a motorcycle following close behind in my blind spot.
Agreed! As in (especially) my area of aviation, the motto is "See and be seen!"

As a motorcyclist, I might mention that the thing that gives me occasional severe angst is the motorist who tailgates me at a criminally close range, even at the open road speed limit. They have not the faintest idea how quickly I can stop if I need to, and I speculate that they would probably have my body into their windscreen before they even touched their own brake pedal if I have to go for an emergency stop (kangaroo, emu, any of the bovine species ....) .

Perhaps I should trade my Suzuki for a Harley and new leathers with suitably intimidating insignia ...... Perhaps I should give it up altogether - I think about that too

FOR
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Old 14th Sep 2017, 05:19   #26 (permalink)
 
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FOR,

I don't think tailgaters of any variety have any idea of how dangerous they are both to themselves and to the vehicle they are following. I have found a good method of encouraging them to keep their distance is to wash my windscreen several times.
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Old 14th Sep 2017, 11:29   #27 (permalink)
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@Eric. The joys of knackered Bantams, pre-heated spark plugs, flywheel magnetos and having to kick the barsteward into life. Bruv and I rode British bikes until someone gave us a Honda 50 (Cub to forriners). It came with a broken crankshaft. We replaced the crank, got it running and thrashed it mercilessly for a year. Everywhere at full throttle (about 37mph) all the time. My brother (who is equipped with larger gonads than me) could negotiate our local roundabout without lifting. That Honda would start, run, had reliable electrics, never leaked oil and never broke down. Until after a year of rinsing, the crankshaft broke.

@Bergerie1. Any motorcyclist who rides close behind and in your blindspot is one of the potential organ donors. I used to drive lorries, I'm very conscious of reaction times, braking distances, and vision splay. I leave plenty of space. I position myself in the outer of the two lines in the road where vehicles run and where I can see both of the mirrors of the vehicle in front, and they can see me (if they look). I also watch the driver in front. If they are not using mirrors, driving erratically or I'm being tailgated, I have a super-secret weapon. It's known as 0-100kph in 4.7 seconds. It's very easy to find and control space on a motorcycle, and mine has nowhere the performance of a ''sportbike''.
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Old 22nd Sep 2017, 12:47   #28 (permalink)
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Perfect autumn weather today, so I went out for a run. About 50km return. Over the mountain to my west. A single track road out, delighting in the temperature transition from warm to cool, and the smell from dry to wet. Trundling at 2000rpm in 1st and 2nd.

On the run back I went past a parked Harley rider suiting up. He clocked the Vee twin, and I got a smile and a wave. Life is good, especially small things.
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Old 22nd Sep 2017, 16:15   #29 (permalink)
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by G-CPTN View Post
My neighbour (a surgeon and forensic pathologist - and also a motorcyclist) refers to his fellow motorcyclists as organ donors.
Bizarre . . .
An old friend is very grateful to a biker. He had been waiting three years for a kidney transplant. The guy in the next bed got the other one. I had a quick look online and sure enough he met his demise on the A14 on a dismal November Friday afternoon just a few hours before my mate got the call from Addenbrookes.
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Old 22nd Sep 2017, 17:21   #30 (permalink)

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Blimey! Yamagata ken celebrates his 65th, buys a bike and half the ruddy site is telling him he won't get to 66!

Belated happy birthday mate. I found (my limited experience of) Japanese driving to be generally okay -- you'll be the expert on that of course -- so I reckon you're in the best place in Asia to be riding, especially as you're not in Tokyo.

Enjoy and carry on riding safely!
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Old 22nd Sep 2017, 17:45   #31 (permalink)
 
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An awful lot of the fatalities are guys who got off a Bantam or. Tiger Cub in 1965 and fifty years later got on a Honda Fireblade. The difference between riding something with a handful of horsepower and something with 150 is challenging to say the least.
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Old 22nd Sep 2017, 18:42   #32 (permalink)
 
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Lots of good sense about road safety in the thread and congratulations to Yamagata ken on his 65th birthday present. However, I then read:-

Quote:
Originally Posted by Yamagata ken View Post
As for the rest, I've been riding most of summer in shirtsleeves, shorts and sandals.
I hope you never find yourself investigating the coefficient of friction twixt human skin/flesh and tarmac!

PS - last summer (whilst in shorts) I managed to fall off my push-bike at barely walking pace onto a freshly graveled country lane - my knee still has the scars...
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Old 22nd Sep 2017, 21:39   #33 (permalink)

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Good on you, Ken.
I learned to ride a motorbike (also a Beeza Bantam) at the age of 11 and fifty years later I have three bikes; hardly ever been without one.

Someone once suggested I joined the organ donor scheme. I have no objection to others using any parts of me worth saving after I've gone - but I have every intention of using up all the best bits myself. Some of them are almost worn out as it is...
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Old 23rd Sep 2017, 07:41   #34 (permalink)
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Greetings, team. Something might be worth pointing out. Yamagata's principal industry is agriculture, I live in a small town about 50km north of the city, the valley is about 30km wide and we are completely surrounded by farmland. Also, this part is a heavy snow area. We average about 10 metres of fresh snowfall every winter, but I have twice experienced 18 metres. Winters are tough, and many of those who can have migrated away for an easier life. The population density here is very low, as are traffic densities away from trunk routes. Yesterday's trundle took me about 1 1/2 hours and I met handful of vehicles (in either direction) during that time. The roads here are well engineered and well maintained, btw, so I'm not dealing with potholes and fractured surfaces.

My commute to work involves travelling from my bedroom to the kitchen (via the stairs and the bog), making a pot of tea and crossing the landing to my office. There's not a lot of rush hour traffic to contend with. Also I don't ride after wine o'clock, or in the rain, and I avoid main roads as much as possible. It's really up to me to ride to stay alive and so far I'm happy with progress. Gravel rash is something I'm well aware of, having come off a couple of times in my yoof. I do cover up for more serious runs than going to the conbeni.
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Old 23rd Sep 2017, 07:55   #35 (permalink)
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These people are really serious.



Studded tyres plus chains.

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Old 23rd Sep 2017, 20:59   #36 (permalink)
 
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Kin ell, I haven't seen the likes of that since my mate bought a Cossack 175 which came complete with OM tool kit and a full set of manuals, including the ones for the optional extra farm implements like ploughs, harrows etc.
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