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Old 19th May 2017, 19:01   #61 (permalink)
 
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Originally Posted by ian16th View Post
Anybody in a position to comment on the unpopularity of BMW's I-Drive system in RHD countries, because 'normal' right handed people have trouble operating it with their left hand?
As one who has had this terrible device for 15 months I can say that it is so non-intuitive that one has to look at its screen all the time it is being used - it cannot therefore be used when moving. It is part of the BMW's disastrous attitude to ergonomics, but I cannot say I would prefer to control it with my right hand.
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Old 20th May 2017, 00:59   #62 (permalink)
 
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Gee....Left Hand Drive affords us right handers to use our right hand for all that stuff of pushing buttons and the like.

Stick to the wrong side/wrong way all you want...but right is right.
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Old 20th May 2017, 02:16   #63 (permalink)
 
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.........my biggest concern has been if things go pear shaped in front of me, respond improperly.
Yes, the last 200 metres of the road to my house narrows to barely one car width, it is possible to pass an oncoming car if both squeeze seriously to the left almost into the bushes. My only incident was meeting a visiting European driver, I turned left, and he turned right. Bang !

After spending a few days driving in the USA I was back home riding my motor cycle along a narrow winding lane at night, and observed glare from the headlights of an approaching car coming around the next corner - and panicked, without a steering wheel to help position to the correct side of the centre line for a few seconds I had absolutely no idea which side I should be on ! I survived, but I'm sure the oncoming driver had a few interesting moments !
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Old 20th May 2017, 02:42   #64 (permalink)
 
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Originally Posted by tdracer View Post
Decades of driving on the right have convinced my sub-conscious that your best escape route is generally to the right - which isn't the case if you're driving on the left.
I have the exact opposite, I'll still steer to the left if my automatic reflex kicks in.

As for passing on the left, I always thought that developed because it kept the sword arm between you and anyone coming the other way. It's notable that Japan is a drive-on-the-left country too, and they also have a tradition of waving swords around.
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Old 20th May 2017, 02:57   #65 (permalink)
 
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I did ok with a UK style MGB in the UK (despite it being my first experience at the mirror image thing)....even when driving it in Europe. Granted, upon arriving in Dover....the nice man in the Blue Uniform...waved me down and suggested it would work much better if I would drive on the other side of the roadway as compared to what I was doing up to that point.

The only problem I ever had was in using a driveway to turn around and head back in the opposite direction.....invariably I back out of the drive way into the exact wrong lane....finding myself head on into on-coming traffic.
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Old 20th May 2017, 22:27   #66 (permalink)


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Originally Posted by Yamagata ken View Post
Gubbins are the technical bits. If you look at the front end of a stagecoach (or wagon) There are shafts, chains, harnesses etc. I don't know the correct terms, so gubbins serves very well. That's where you can get some, but if you don't have a wagon handy, you can take your computer or washing machine apart. Then you'll have plenty of gubbins.
I still have a couple neighbors who trust me, so I'm going to call on them and see if I can find any gubbins in their stuff.

I'll let everyone know how this works out.
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Old 20th May 2017, 23:11   #67 (permalink)
 
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Good pub question - where in mainland America do they drive on the left?
A lot of people will get Guyana, formerly British Guiana, but not so many will get neighbouring Surinam, formerly Dutch Guiana. The reason, as explained in the article accompanying peekay4's map (post #37) is that when The Netherlands switched to driving on the right, many of its colonies did not switch. The Dutch East Indies which became Indonesia is another example.

Re trains, when I lived in Paris I had to get used to looking to the right to see when my train was coming when using the RER which follows the French railway practice of "driving" on the left, then switching to looking left when I transferred from the RER to the Metro, which confusingly "drives" on the right!
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Old 20th May 2017, 23:17   #68 (permalink)
 
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Bit of slightly naughty thread drift. Which countries still use Fahrenheit?

https://www.google.co.uk/imgres?imgu...RTCIMQ9QEIKjAA

Have a go before you look. I'll start you off with the USA, then it's ...er, um
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Old 20th May 2017, 23:48   #69 (permalink)
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Anybody in a position to comment on the unpopularity of BMW's I-Drive system in RHD countries, because 'normal' right handed people have trouble operating it with their left hand?
I've grown to like it, but then, it had not dawned on me that I'm at an advantage as a leftie.

However, I'm a bit flash. One button on the wheel and I just say, 'Address book'. She answers. 'Home - start navigation'. The directions appear on the tarmac in front of me. Cool/nifty/sexy. Her voice that is . . . sexy. And she always says Please do this or that. Unlike the person formally known as my wife.
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Old 21st May 2017, 00:41   #70 (permalink)
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This seems an appropriate opportunity to ask this question :

Does it take much practice to get accustomed to using the LHS sidestick in an Airbus if you are naturally right handed ?
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Old 21st May 2017, 01:31   #71 (permalink)
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You'd think it would, wouldn't you? But for me, machines seemed to do much as I wanted them to even when steering with my knees. Many a nice meal, cooked on the manifold, eaten while on the EMPTY by midnight M4. I knew just where to stop to have it cooked to a T.

However, writing with the right - legible but very poor. Cricket or golf - I could hit the ball, but heck knows where it would go. Steering an aircraft with a tiller - fine. Oh, and then there's that other thing humans do. It seems doing it with the 'other' hand is better. It feels more like a stranger.

Nowt so queer as folk. Perhaps not the best old expression to use at this juncture.


Done this before I know about foot painting, but . . .

This is one I knocked up quickly with the brush tied to my willy.


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Old 21st May 2017, 07:01   #72 (permalink)
 
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Does it take much practice to get accustomed to using the LHS sidestick in an Airbus if you are naturally right handed ?
Nope. About a few minutes at most. But then, i started out flying a stick in glider planes and occasionally had to switch it to the left hand to do something else with my right one, which was never an issue either. Neither does switching sides on a "conventional" airplane like the 737.
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Old 21st May 2017, 07:37   #73 (permalink)
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Thanks for that info Denti

I was in Mongolia (Ulaanbataar)this week for work and saw that about 70% of the cars have steering wheels on the RHS even though they drive on the right side of the road. I asked about this and my local contact said that it's because the second hand cars they import from Japan make motoring more affordable. They drive on the right due to their time under Russian rule. It's odd to see cars with drivers on different sides passing by.I mentioned that overtaking would be an issue due to the compromised visibility and he just said that you ask your passenger if it's clear for overtaking. And if they're alone,they just take a punt.

The majority of these RHD cars are Toyota Priuses which he said can be bought for about US$2k.
kkk
jjj
kkk

Last edited by TWT; 21st May 2017 at 08:50.
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Old 21st May 2017, 08:35   #74 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by TWT View Post

The majority of these RHD cars are Toyota Prius's which he said can be bought for about US$2k.
It seems that Priuses may have a long life?
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Old 21st May 2017, 09:21   #75 (permalink)
 
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Originally Posted by G-CPTN View Post
It seems so, yes. One of my former colleagues has an early model Prius (like the one pictured in that article) that has clocked up well over 200,000 miles and is still performing as well as it did when he bought it, around 15 years or so ago.

Last time I spoke to him, he mentioned that the only major work he'd had done on the car was the regular replacement of the brake discs. It seems the discs corrode and need replacement at around 60,000 miles or so, before the brake pads have worn enough to need changing. He reckons one reason for this is that the brakes don't get a lot of use, as much of the braking comes from regeneration, so the discs tend to corrode, rather than wear out.

The reduced demand on the petrol engine may well extend its life, too, as a fair bit of the short duration peak demand comes largely from the electric drive system. What I find surprising is that the batteries are lasting so well in these older cars. There are reports of Prius taxis that have clocked up very high mileages, yet battery pack failure seems to be pretty rare.
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Old 21st May 2017, 10:24   #76 (permalink)

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As one who has had this terrible device for 15 months I can say that it is so non-intuitive that one has to look at its screen all the time it is being used - it cannot therefore be used when moving. It is part of the BMW's disastrous attitude to ergonomics, but I cannot say I would prefer to control it with my right hand.
I first had an iDrive in 2004 on a 5 series BMW. I hated it initially but adapted quite quickly. Only when I sold it and bought an E Class Mercedes did I appreciate how good it was. Perhaps why so many manufacturers have copied the basic idea.

If you say it cannot be used when moving that would apply to any number of operations in modern vehicles with a plethora of switches, indications and screens.

Quote:
It seems so, yes. One of my former colleagues has an early model Prius (like the one pictured in that article) that has clocked up well over 200,000 miles and is still performing as well as it did when he bought it, around 15 years or so ago.
Unfortunately it is still a vile car in terms of comfort, noise and appearance!
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Old 21st May 2017, 10:30   #77 (permalink)
 
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Unfortunately it is still a vile car in terms of comfort, noise and appearance!
I agree about the appearance, not sure about the comfort or noise, though. I've ridden in it a few times, and it seemed pretty comfortable and reasonably quiet. Not as quiet as the later model, for sure, but a lot better than many other cars of that period.

The biggest issue I'd have had with it was the awkward boot. The hatchback design of the later models is a heck of a lot more practical.
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Old 21st May 2017, 10:47   #78 (permalink)
 
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Finally I've found the answer!

The simple solution,

The Dunsfold Collection :: Land Rover Centre Steer

And the German solution
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Old 21st May 2017, 11:03   #79 (permalink)
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Regarding temperature, I still do a quick conversion in my head to get a figure that I am comfortable with, degrees C x 2 - 10% +32, (round any decimal up or down) it also helps to know that 16C=61F and 28C=82F.
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Old 21st May 2017, 11:13   #80 (permalink)
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-40 deg C = -40 deg F
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