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Old 18th May 2017, 18:50   #21 (permalink)
 
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I think the real confusion sets in with Eurocopter, as the German-derived models are CCW, the French ones are CW.
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Old 18th May 2017, 20:25   #22 (permalink)
 
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[QUOTE]True for some, but not for our "home grown" helos[/QUOTE

And is it true what they say about our choppers?

Q?Q?Q?Q
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Old 18th May 2017, 20:39   #23 (permalink)
 
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Thanks for all the info folks, I will advise said lady and hope she doesn't drive in England, especially after trying to explain roundabouts to her
Send her to Swindon I dares ya!
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Old 18th May 2017, 20:51   #24 (permalink)
 
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Allan Lupton,

Since you seem to know a thing or two about:
What are the Alpine Bus and where did they keep the right hand side steering wheel into the 20th century?

Also do you know about the tradition of some trucks in Italy having right side steering wheel?

Thanks in advance.
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Old 18th May 2017, 20:55   #25 (permalink)
 
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When Sweden switched from one side to the other they did so on a pre-planned Sunday.

Trucks had a problem the next day as most of them didn't work that previous day.

Nigeria learned from that lesson, so they made their switchover for cars on one Sunday and the switchover for lorries the following Sunday.
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Old 18th May 2017, 21:16   #26 (permalink)
 
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What about the Bristol Sycamore?
The Bristol Sycamore was British designed and had a rotor that rotated clockwise looking from above. I know, because I did my initial helicopter training on them.

The Sycamore could be described as the best flying training machine ever built because if you could fly a Sycamore you could fly ANYTHING!!!!
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Old 18th May 2017, 21:37   #27 (permalink)
 
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Cazalet

i lived in Sweden from 1991-1994 and one of those years was the 30th anniversary of the great change over. A lot of TV coverage and B&W film of what happened and I thought goods vehicles were around on the roads on the big day. The change started at 11 am with all vehicles coming toa halt where they were , they deliberately chose mid morning as people would have read papers and heard radio and been alert as opposed to a midnight switch.
Everyone stayed still for one hour so major junction traffic lights etc could be turned off and others on and at 12 all vehicles made a sharp right hand turn to join the opposite lane as close to a right angle as possible and then carried on their way, the idea being that vehicles would have to swap at slow manouvering speed not any shallow angle higher speed joins.

There were every few dual carriageways or motor way style slip roads in those days especially away from Greater Stockholm but there were a few and these had a sort of duplicate on off ramp /slip built which was policed on the day so that people didnt use the slip they had used for years.

Two things stood out

1 It was as one might expect very well panned and very orderly

2 The traffic was a tiny fraction of what it was in the 90s and the decision really was a now or never. Indeed it was now for the cars and never for the railways which remained on the British side , not sure if they have tried to chnage since but its not an easy job with rails (think points)
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Old 18th May 2017, 22:13   #28 (permalink)
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From my bank of memories. 59 and 60 (Sunliner) respectively. Both imported into the UK new.



Marchelle Fantastic spotlight (sp?) - to stop other drivers seeing where they were going. Big steering wheels obviated the need for powered steering. K & L Easyturn. Seven and sixpence. IIRC

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Old 18th May 2017, 22:29   #29 (permalink)
 
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Re Swedish changeover:Railways driving on the left/right have little to do with road rules. Portuguese trains drive on the left and also many trains in France and Spain (end elsewhere?) as far as I am aware. Only when rail systems also operate on streets does this become a problem: hence Porto metro drives on the right. Trains on the left may be a legacy of the very early influence of British engineers on the procedures used on continental railways.
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Old 18th May 2017, 22:34   #30 (permalink)
 
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For some reason that I could never understand just about every photo I have seen of an original 1930s Bugatti car (built in France by a company founded by an Italian) had RHD.

https://uk.images.search.yahoo.com/s...=p%3As%2Cv%3Ai
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Old 18th May 2017, 22:50   #31 (permalink)
 
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Originally Posted by WingNut60 View Post
And this same topic can lead, of course, to the history of LHD for fixed wing vs RHD for rotary wing.


Sikorsky being Russian had something to do with that, as I recall.
the reason for this I was told years ago was a quirk of how the initial pilots were taught. The story I was told makes sense and has a ring of truth to it but may not be correct but I would love to know if there are any experts who can verify or discount it.

The story I heard goes like this:

Sikorsky was asked to build a helicopter (XR-4?) for the USAAF and his initial design had the pilot in the conventional left seat (same as his earlier fixed wing aircraft). Sikorsky was the only helicopter builder/pilot at the time.

He had to teach the USAAF how to fly it - a few handpicked USAAF fixed wing instructors were taught to fly it by Sikorsky himself. Sikorsky was unwilling to try and learn to fly opposite handed (understandable given the sensitivity of the controls) so he sat in the command seat.

That meant the senior instructors all learnt to fly from the right seat. They also were unwilling to learn to fly opposite handed. They then went on to train the initial crop of USAAF rotary general instructors who sat in the left seat.

That meant the trainee pilots were taught while sitting in the right seat and that continued to today.

Like I said, not sure if correct but doesn't seem unreasonable and I believe Sikorsky's fixed wing aircraft used the conventional left seat.

Last edited by jonkster; 18th May 2017 at 23:35.
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Old 18th May 2017, 23:21   #32 (permalink)
 
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Rivets, where would you get that RH drive placed in the '59 -- UK I presume? And was it a complete installation, or just a jerry-rigging?
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Old 18th May 2017, 23:21   #33 (permalink)
 
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Most people carriers let the passengers off on the left hand (port) side. On a large vessal it would be obvious for the pilot to be on the left in order to get alongside safely. In a car the passenger is generally by the driver so in order for the passenger to alight on the left side the driver has to be on the right. QED
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Old 18th May 2017, 23:38   #34 (permalink)
 
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Originally Posted by Rwy in Sight View Post
Allan Lupton,

Since you seem to know a thing or two about:
What are the Alpine Bus and where did they keep the right hand side steering wheel into the 20th century?

Also do you know about the tradition of some trucks in Italy having right side steering wheel?

Thanks in advance.
The Alps are in Switzerland, France, Austria and Italy these days and I saw RHD buses on alpine roads in all of 'em in the 1970s/80s

The Italian rule of the road history is complicated, as at one time it was different in the town and the country (can't remember which was which). As I wrote before RHD with right rule of the road allows the driver to see the near edge of the road better.

Quote:
Originally Posted by rightbank View Post
For some reason that I could never understand just about every photo I have seen of an original 1930s Bugatti car (built in France by a company founded by an Italian) had RHD.
You could even say it was built in formerly German territory . . well that's what it was when the company was founded.
As I said, French Grands Routiers were RHD well into the post Second War period and I suppose you should include racing cars. If anyone offers you a LHD Bugatti it is probably an Argentinian fake/
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Old 19th May 2017, 00:57   #35 (permalink)
 
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Hand starting piston engined aeroplanes ? Some props - mainly UK sourced engines - clockwise when viewed from the front, others - mainly USA - anti-clockwise.

I'm of the opinion, having read it somewhere, that whereas more countries drive on the right, more people drive on the left, due to population demographics. But I would doubt it ?
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Old 19th May 2017, 01:29   #36 (permalink)
 
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I'm of the opinion, having read it somewhere, that whereas more countries drive on the right, more people drive on the left, due to population demographics. But I would doubt it ?
Left-hand Traffic: about 31% by number of countries, or 35% in terms of population.

Green: RHT
Orange: LHT



Nice history from: Why do some countries drive on the left and others on the right? - World Standards
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Old 19th May 2017, 01:44   #37 (permalink)
 
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Originally Posted by Windy Militant View Post
Send her to Swindon I dares ya!
... Swindon traffic circle ..
For fans of traffic circles (roundabouts) please try Indonesia where traffic on the roundabout is required to, but seldom does, give way to traffic entering from the left.
Similarly, until only a few years ago, traffic on all roads in their RHD system was required to give way to traffic entering from the left.
That rule now rescinded; but not for roundabouts.
I suspect that this was somehow a left-over from Dutch traffic rules as applied to a RHD environment.

Or consider the convention on roads used by logging trucks, which always take the inside running on bends, for all other vehicles to move to the outside running when approaching a bend.
I'll let you think about the possible flaws in that convention.
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Old 19th May 2017, 02:00   #38 (permalink)
 
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Originally Posted by Loose rivets View Post
From my bank of memories. 59 and 60 (Sunliner) respectively. Both imported into the UK new.

Marchelle Fantastic spotlight (sp?) - to stop other drivers seeing where they were going. Big steering wheels obviated the need for powered steering. K & L Easyturn. Seven and sixpence. IIRC
Many of the LHD American car, import conversions of the day into Australia involved about 3 metres of bicycle chain behind the dashboard or even inside the engine compartment.
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Old 19th May 2017, 02:04   #39 (permalink)
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Rivets, where would you get that RH drive placed in the '59 -- UK I presume? And was it a complete installation, or just a jerry-rigging?
My pal was a bandleader and with his dad, owner of the Martello Caravan site at Walton on the Naze. After the war, the holiday industry took off, and the swinging sixties started a bit before that. They made serious money, and owned the first house I'd been in where the carpets reached the walls.

Ford made RHD back then and they were imported by erm, American Autos, I think it was, on the Great West Road. I remember the Sunliner arriving and 8 of us went to Clacton with the roof down. I'd have gone naked in the middle of winter to go out in that. Anyway, it had a fortunate by product.

My pal built a house in Frinton, and had a huge garage with the second set of remote operated doors in the area. So strong were they and so powerful was the motor, that it would have cleaved a Lotus in two. Which was significant, since the cold-cathode detector was tripped by a Lotus' starter. Anyway, I ended up owning that house for 33 years.

Lendrum and Hartman imported a Pontiac GTO about that time, and the staff were more excited about going out in that than their Bentley Tourer which had been built entirely from genuine spares. 9,000 that was, while the Fords were about 3k each.

What a world that was then.

what was this thread about?

Oh yes. Swapping sides. The Rivetess and I used to land in LHR and daughter would pick us up in our car. After dinner we'd often set out into the London night, in the rain, on roads with bends in them, in a car that had stick shift. And yes, we'd drive on the left. Mostly. Really mostly. If I didn't, her would screetch, and there's nothing worse than the screetch of a Rivetess - as I found out today when I'd forgotten to turn my hearing aids on.
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Old 19th May 2017, 02:22   #40 (permalink)
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The Skyliner was the one I always wanted. 140 microswitches IIRC

https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=19...14dLWwHfDTLQM:

Gosh, this was it to a T. Same seats in that mature finish.

Pal used to put on his white band suit and drive the Clacton Carnival Queen about - sitting up on the back. For some reason folk used the car as a collecting bucket and hefted pennies into it. Big old pennies. The finish was the new Diamond Enamel, but not that diamondy. The car was wrecked - all with people's generosity.


https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=fo...VVVucQ1x0e2nM:
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