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Old 14th Feb 2017, 15:22   #21 (permalink)
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Yes, Sallyann. We seem to have 3 pairs resident around us - and surprisingly, two pairs of robins. I think our garden is where their territories meet. We do have a lot of trees, too.
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Old 14th Feb 2017, 15:43   #22 (permalink)
 
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You get the most song where the territories met. It may sound friendly to us but most of it is about warning others to keep out.
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Old 14th Feb 2017, 16:27   #23 (permalink)
 
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At this time of year I can imagine that most tits we see are blue.
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Old 14th Feb 2017, 16:39   #24 (permalink)
 
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The best singer, in my opinion, very melancholic. (the blackbird, that is!)
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Old 14th Feb 2017, 16:49   #25 (permalink)
 
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Trichomonosis is the disease to look out for. Yes, avian pox comes and goes, but finches have really suffered withTrichomonosis.

Essentially, the birds starve to death, as a parasite remains at the back of the birds throat and gullet, and the bird can no longer feed. The bird can last for a while until it succumbs.

Typical symptoms are birds staying close to feeders/water and trying unsuccessfully to feed. They are also fluffed up (as birds are when sick), and at this stage, it is kinder to put it out of its misery.

The disease is also known as canker, and can be seen in pigeons and raptors, and it was responsible for many deaths in the greenfinch family. Terrible disease, and if you do see it, I would suggest stopping feeding so that the birds disperse, minimizing the risk of them picking up infected food.
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Old 15th Feb 2017, 21:52   #26 (permalink)


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I like Tits, I see them all the time, different shapes, sizes and colours... here are some of my Tit voyeurism....

Blue ones










Last edited by NutLoose; 15th Feb 2017 at 22:10.
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Old 15th Feb 2017, 21:56   #27 (permalink)


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Willow Tits





Marsh Tit



Coal Tit





And Great Tits

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Old 15th Feb 2017, 22:00   #28 (permalink)


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Have a pheasant evening and I will look in again.....

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Old 15th Feb 2017, 23:09   #29 (permalink)
 
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It's times like these when I miss Slasher.
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Old 15th Feb 2017, 23:22   #30 (permalink)
 
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Helol

Thanks for the info, sounds horrific..

Nutloose - nice pics...
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Old 16th Feb 2017, 13:26   #31 (permalink)
 
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UK birders will not doubt appreciate the species contents of our feeders less than 5 minutes ago. We had lined up at the same time:


The common ones


Great / Blue / Coal Tit
Blackbird
Starling
Robin
Great Spotted Woodpecker
Goldfinch
Chaffinch
Wood Pigeon


The not so common ones


Brambling
Siskin
Linnet
Pheasant
Tree Sparrow
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Old 16th Feb 2017, 14:04   #32 (permalink)
 
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You haven't got the parakeets up there yet? They are on the way north...

Bloody immigrants!
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Old 16th Feb 2017, 14:50   #33 (permalink)
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In my previous garden there was a proliferation of birds from the usual small finches up to Sparrowhawks.

I hung nut-feeders (note, plural) high up in the trees (I used a long pole with a hooked end to position them) where I could see them from my 'workdesk' - ie I was able to constantly bird watch.

There was a noticeable pecking order (thus the multiple feeders to allow variety).
The blue tits were aggressive towards each other and so tended to visit alone and rejected any other blue tit, whereas the long-tailed tits arrived as a troop and happily shared one feeder before flying off together as a family.

The male woodpecker that discovered the feeder(s) brought a female woodpecker when he next visited (and they continued to arrive together).

The sparrowhawk would occasionally rush in and grab a siskin or whatever was unfortunate to be 'surprised'.

A pair of wood-pigeons that regularly perched on the pergola fell foul of the sparrowhawk - I saw them being taken (one at a time) in an explosion of feathers - too dim to realise the danger of their exposed perch and too slow (or dim) to respond to the attack - sitting ducks you could say.

The jackdaws were the clever ones. As each brood matured they would discover the feeders but were unable to 'feed' as their weight caused the feeder to swing, however, they soon learned to arrive in pairs with one on each side of the feeder balancing the other.

It was also interesting to watch immature blackbirds from the same brood happily browsing (at ground level) until they matured when they would (apparently) be prepared to 'fight to the death' either side of an invisible line in an area with no obvious physical delineation - ie though there were hedges which you would think would mark the edges of territory, the 'barrier' would be at some point on the lawn (battles always occurred at the same invisible line).

The wrens inhabited the hedges and were only fleetingly seen (felt rather than seen) as they darted between hedges.

The robins, on the other hand were bold (individually - they repelled all other robins) whenever a fork or spade was inserted into the ground and would perch on the wheelbarrow within arm's length waiting for 'treats'.

Many years ago in our small suburban garden that fronted onto a road my father had a tame blackbird that would visit regularly and take worms or grubs from his hand (this delighted my young nephews). My father only had to walk out of the front door and the blackbird would appear, expecting to be fed.
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Old 16th Feb 2017, 16:08   #34 (permalink)
 
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To each their choice of Tits, I suppose.
Here's mine:
Attached Images
File Type: jpg tits.jpg (42.4 KB, 26 views)
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Old 16th Feb 2017, 18:17   #35 (permalink)
 
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Seems like a modest maiden.....................
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Old 17th Feb 2017, 13:21   #36 (permalink)
 
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Signs of the coming good weather has seen two pairs of Gold-crests spending quite of late afternoon time picking up the tiny millet seeds that the larger species seem not bothered with, much smaller than the Wren, they beat their wings almost to humming bird type speeds, when I get a photo of one I will post on here......
We also seem to have aquired a apir of these Buzzards that circle round most of the time...but I think they really only look for bigger meals ..ala Road Kill..
PR-B
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Old 17th Feb 2017, 13:43   #37 (permalink)
 
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We saw a falcon dealing with a wood dove right in the middle of the pedestrian street in Verden, Germany. The falcon had the dove in a death grip but could not quite dispatch it. Finally the dove managed to struggle free and fly off at low level trailing feathers, up the street towards the cathedral with the falcon in hot pursuit.

A small boy was watching all this play out from just a few meters off, when I thought "Take a good look, kid. Nature's not really the way those Disney films want to show it to you."

I have noticed fewer tits here too. Last winter I was running through suet balls at a great rate but this year they are lasting for months. We've been having bird flu, and I wonder if that's had an impact. Fewer thrushes, and sparrows too, and the neighbor's chickens are in confinement, unable to come raise hell in Madame's flower beds.
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Old 18th Feb 2017, 06:37   #38 (permalink)
 
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Cue the duty Goon Show standing joke:

Him: Do you come here often?

Her: Only during the mating season.

Quite risqué for the 1950's.
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