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Old 3rd Dec 2016, 09:14   #61 (permalink)
 
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And does the `Rainbow Cafe allow customers in wearing leather shoes?
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Old 3rd Dec 2016, 17:46   #62 (permalink)
 
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Cambridge Rainbow vegetarian cafe refuses new £5 note - BBC News

Well:

a) Numerous countries including NZ, Australia and Scotland have had polymer banknotes for some time and we haven't heard a cheep (sorry) about their chemical makeup.

b) What is the Rainbow vegetarian cafe going to do when ALL our notes are polymer? Another one bites, Another one bites etc.
I have a feeling that what they are doing is unlawful. I can't recall the statute off the top of my head (and can't be arsed to to spend time doing a web search) but I thought that all people selling stuff had an obligation to accept legal tender, in whatever form that might be. Refusing to accept £5 notes is almost certainly unlawful, and could end up with them being prosecuted, I think, if someone was so minded as to push the point.

If they were anywhere near me then I'd be inclined to try it on just for the simple pleasure of seeing them get their stupidity made more public. As someone else posted, the animal content is minute, wasn't it something like half a cow to make all the £5 notes that have been produced?

I bet they get more animal products on all the paper notes they accept, from the various stains etc the things all have.
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Old 3rd Dec 2016, 18:03   #63 (permalink)
 
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If you owe money to someone, they are expected to accept payment in legal tender. No-one has to give change; you should tender the exact amount



Legal tender has a very narrow and technical meaning in the settlement of debts. It means that a debtor cannot successfully be sued for non-payment if he pays into court in legal tender. It does not mean that any ordinary transaction has to take place in legal tender or only within the amount denominated by the legislation. Both parties are free to agree to accept any form of payment whether legal tender or otherwise according to their wishes. In order to comply with the very strict rules governing an actual legal tender it is necessary, for example, actually to offer the exact amount due because no change can be demanded.
A debt is not discharged if you offer legal tender and it is refused. The debt remains outstanding (at least for six years). However having a cash payment refused is a good defence if accused of not paying a debt. Refusing cash is, strictly, a breach of contract.
The Bank of England produces notes for £5, £10, £20 and £50. These are legal tender for any amount.
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Old 3rd Dec 2016, 20:48   #64 (permalink)
 
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Hindu temples ban new 'animal fat' £5 note - BBC Newsbeat

Minimum donation now a tenner!
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Old 3rd Dec 2016, 22:15   #65 (permalink)
 
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Sorry onetrack

Don't like sweet potato or roast beetroot, and not at all sure about the onion. Can I substitute stringless beans and purple sprouting broccoli, please?

Some friends in Sydney tell me lamb is very expensive in Oz because so much gets exported to the Middle East....plus I suppose there's a lot of demand from the middle eastern immigrants.
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Old 3rd Dec 2016, 22:35   #66 (permalink)
 
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I guess so, onetrack, as lamb/mutton is the most commonly consumed meat in Arab countries. Pork is out of course for religious reasons and beef didn't traditionally feature much in the culture as much of the region is not suitable for cattle raising. You get goat too of course but I've never been keen.

When I was in Aden I ate mutton at an Arab feast and it was just luscious. Mutton is hard to obtain here as 90% of sheep destined for the table are slaughtered as lambs, but I'd like to taste some slow cooked mutton again - a bit like pulled pork in texture, but a nicer flavour in my opinion.
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Old 3rd Dec 2016, 23:35   #67 (permalink)
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Basil
Numerous countries including NZ, Australia and Scotland have had polymer banknotes for some time and we haven't heard a cheep (sorry) about their chemical makeup.
Polymer banknotes were invented in Australia by the CSIRO after the invention of the colour photocopier led to forgeries of the the old paper notes. The polymer for all the worlds 'plastic' notes is made by Innovia in Melbourne, and Note Printing Australia also print notes for Bangladesh, Brunei, Chile, Indonesia, Kuwait, Malaysia, Mexico, Nepal, New Zealand, Papua New Guinea, Romania, Western Samoa, Singapore, Solomon Islands, Sri Lanka, Thailand, Vietnam as well as Australia.

They say they can switch from (mostly beef) tallow to a plant based lubricant in the manufacturing process, but at higher cost.
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Old 4th Dec 2016, 00:04   #68 (permalink)
 
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Wasn't aware of the cost factor, Hempy, but is an interesting paradox - the cost of printing money.
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Old 4th Dec 2016, 08:40   #69 (permalink)
 
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Quote:
the cost of printing money
. . . and the the fact that notes tend towards their intrinsic value
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Old 4th Dec 2016, 08:50   #70 (permalink)
 
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If you want to get on the wick of the human factors / ergonomics experts, ask them where most of their original data on the difference in sizes and shapes of human beings came from.

The original collectors of this data were the Germans immediately before WW II
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Old 4th Dec 2016, 09:53   #71 (permalink)
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Basil
Quote:
the cost of printing money
. . . and the the fact that notes tend towards their intrinsic value
It costs NPA AU34c to print a banknote. That's about one £ isn't it?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ogre
The original collectors of this data were the Germans immediately before WW II
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Old 4th Dec 2016, 10:09   #72 (permalink)
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ogre View Post
If you want to get on the wick of the human factors / ergonomics experts, ask them where most of their original data on the difference in sizes and shapes of human beings came from.

The original collectors of this data were the Germans immediately before WW II
Likewise, much of the data used to set "safe" exposure limits for radiation was derived from studies of the victims of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Also, I was told during training that much of the data used to determine human susceptibility to hypothermia and the specific effects of it, was derived from research the Nazis carried out on prisoners at the death camps.

We're so constrained (and rightly so) when it comes to human experimentation, that often the only way to obtain some data is to use that which was obtained by highly unethical means. One thing that the Nazi regime were very good at was documenting pretty much everything they did very well. I had access to read much of their original "medical research" documentation years ago, and although very gruesome, there's absolutely no question that it has made a significant contribution to the protective equipment we now use.
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Old 4th Dec 2016, 10:11   #73 (permalink)
 
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It costs NPA AU34c to print a banknote. That's about one £ isn't it?
Not quite yet.
When D1 was married in Sydney, £ was $2.40
Australian DiL asked if we'd consider moving to Oz. I said that when £=$4 I'd consider it.
Doesn't look like happening soon.
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Old 4th Dec 2016, 15:09   #74 (permalink)
 
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Thoroughly enjoyed my Quail stuffed with Foie Gras today, paid for with plastic money.
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Old 15th Feb 2017, 11:15   #75 (permalink)


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Bank of England are to keep these in circulation and introduce £10 polymer note despite the concerns of the veggies. Well done to the BofE. Stand tough against the selectively outraged.
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Old 15th Feb 2017, 22:01   #76 (permalink)
 
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Whilst I understand the concerns of the vegan and Hindu communities regarding the dead animal content of these notes, it's probably just as likely that the sweat and skin of the innumerable handlers of the currency contain even more horrors ...
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Old 15th Feb 2017, 22:53   #77 (permalink)

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Nigeria introduced placky banknotes when I worked there. Then there was a documentary which showed them to be one of the top notes in terms of contamination.

NEO
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Old 16th Feb 2017, 21:18   #78 (permalink)
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Wasn't Australia one of (if not the) first with plastic banknotes?

ISTR them back in the 1980s . . .
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Old 16th Feb 2017, 23:00   #79 (permalink)
 
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I think so .. I certainly remember ripping the p.ss out of my oz colleagues about their ludicrously coloured plastic toy money.
Fast forward and now I think it's a great idea. Maybe one day I'll buy some amazon shares as well
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Old 17th Feb 2017, 09:38   #80 (permalink)
 
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I think the Aussie notes date from around 1988, but nearer home (to me at least) the Isle of Man issued polymer £10 notes in 1983. For those not aware, although the Isle of Man uses the £Sterling as its currency, it issues its own notes and coins, which although on a par with the £ are only legal tender on the island.
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