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Old 8th Mar 2014, 19:18   #21 (permalink)
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My father was a great tripe & onions fan, we often went to the UCP (United Cow Products) shop in Blackpool (for those that know the town, next to RHO Hills/ The White Swan (Mucky Duck) but on the corner of Bank Hey St and Victoria St - where Boots is now) to buy it

Horse shoe shaped Black Pudding, boiled and served with crusty bread is still a favourite
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Old 8th Mar 2014, 19:21   #22 (permalink)
 
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Toast with milk isn't a million miles away from 'bread and butter' pudding, a favourite staple when growing up. As a special treat a handful of raisins were thrown in the mix.

Last edited by beaufort1; 9th Mar 2014 at 07:27.
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Old 8th Mar 2014, 20:11   #23 (permalink)
 
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Mum made us toast for breakfast ( one side only for speed ) we then dipped it into a big cup of northen brew.I still do it to this day.
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Old 8th Mar 2014, 20:32   #24 (permalink)
 
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Tripe & onions with salt & pepper & vinegar - with some brown stuff that I think was called 'elder' (??) Stew & 'ard cake...
Top Lancashire scran. Hard to find now as the proper butchers are closing due to Morrisons and Asda taking over.
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Old 8th Mar 2014, 22:56   #25 (permalink)
 
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Lardy cake
Heart attack on a plate. A sort of pastry made with lots of lard and sultanas covered with suger so that when it was cooked it caramalised and went sticky or crunchy. Wiltshire specialty I believe
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Old 8th Mar 2014, 23:10   #26 (permalink)
 
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As I keep asking, for all the stodge my generation were fed, much to the horror of the grub nazis, how come it is the later "sensibly" fed generations that are all turning into blimps?
You could still lie me flat on the floor hoy a sheet of paper over me and make a brass rubbing.
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Old 8th Mar 2014, 23:10   #27 (permalink)

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Bread dipped in the fat after the bacon was fried, 'dip' for other people, in our house it was 'fatty bread'.

Friends and relatives had fried bread but that wasn't our way.

My ma had just one frying pan, heavy and blackened inside, that never encountered water nor detergent. Nothing ever stuck to it. Its greatest triumph was left-over mash browned top and bottom, I have never succeeded on matching hers.

Toast in tea - no, never encountered that.
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Old 8th Mar 2014, 23:17   #28 (permalink)
 
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Yer left over mash mixed up wi left over cabbage pop it in frying pan and well brown it both sides you got bubble n Squeak,goes great with bacon and eggs,you dont know what you missing.
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Old 8th Mar 2014, 23:19   #29 (permalink)
 
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Whats all this pease pudding you lot eat Monsieur Draper?
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Old 8th Mar 2014, 23:20   #30 (permalink)
 
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I have never succeeded on matching hers.
I've never had an apple or blackberry pie like my Mum used to make either. We had one of those fireplaces that had the oven next to it and I'm convinced it was the oven that made the difference. It was a big old thing, I used to climb in it when I was a nipper much to my mother's horror.
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Old 8th Mar 2014, 23:25   #31 (permalink)

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Pease pudding is a potential weapon of mass destruction according to security at Newcastle Airport, if you have more than 100ml of it they will confiscate it.

Or maybe that's to stop it leaving Tyneside, where it belongs.
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Old 8th Mar 2014, 23:28   #32 (permalink)
 
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Ah..the soylent green mystery uncovered!
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Old 9th Mar 2014, 00:19   #33 (permalink)
 
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Old fashioned "proper" black pudding boiled and served with English mustard, food of the gods...
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Old 9th Mar 2014, 00:21   #34 (permalink)


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........ lie me flat on the floor hoy a sheet of paper over me ......
Interesting how words and expression cross borders. 'Hoy' is presumably a Geordie expression for 'chuck', but I've never heard it before, but it's used in Afrikaans (spelt 'gooi') which would originally be from Dutch.
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Old 9th Mar 2014, 00:23   #35 (permalink)
 
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Peas pudding is what everybody in this country used to eat until the potato made the scene,twere a staple, I believe down south it was called peas porridge.
Ham and pea pud, goes together like strawberries and cream,incidentally the tinned stuff you lot get down south is shite,that int proper peas pudding,

indeed, hoyyahammaowerhinny is Geordie for pass me the hammer mate
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Old 9th Mar 2014, 00:33   #36 (permalink)
 
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As I keep asking, for all the stodge my generation were fed, much to the horror of the grub nazis, how come it is the later "sensibly" fed generations that are all turning into blimps?
You could still lie me flat on the floor hoy a sheet of paper over me and make a brass rubbing.
Used to be as thin as a rake on a diet that included Greasy Joes from the Transport Cafe. GJ - egg and bacon sarnie with the bread dipped in the hot bacon fat, so much that it ran down your fingers.

Pease pudding hot
Pease pudding cold
Pease pudding in the pot
Nine days old.
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Old 9th Mar 2014, 01:26   #37 (permalink)
 
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Bread spread with (beef) dripping was a regular feature of my early life on a poverty-stricken dairy farm (and as a friend often quoted, "you've never known poverty until you've been a dairy farmer").
It amazes me we all reached advanced ages without our arteries becoming plugged like an ancient kitchen sink.
No history of any circulatory problems in our families, and all the ancestors lived long healthy lives. I'm as fit as someone 15 yrs younger, and I don't carry a sizeable gut.
Must be something in the beef dripping. I'm not so sure about the pig products, I'm very leery of bacon fat, I reckon it's certified early death.
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