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Old 2nd Feb 2007, 18:56   #1 (permalink)
 
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origins of "sayings"

Full 9 yards = 27 foot length of a WW1 Vickers (?) machine gun belt, hence you are giving them the full 9 yards if you really try to expend a full belt of ammo at someone.

How about shanks' pony?

What about Malta dog?

Where do these phrases come from?

Any more? Might seem trivia but Longhaul demands trivia if you don't want to drift off to sleep in mid-atlantic.
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Old 2nd Feb 2007, 19:05   #2 (permalink)
 
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Quote:
...if you don't want to drift off to sleep in mid-atlantic.
... because you'd be up the creek without a paddle.
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Old 2nd Feb 2007, 19:31   #3 (permalink)
 
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Just done a quick search and for shank's Pony i got

In the UK and Australia the term is commonly 'shanks' pony'. It is sometimes capitalized as 'Shank's pony' as some reports claim it to have derived from an individual called Shanks, or from the Shanks & Company Ltd. (formed in 1853 and now absorbed into Armitage Shanks), who previously manufactured lawn-mowing machines. One such horse-drawn mower had no seat and the driver had to walk behind it. These machines did exist and this would be a plausible theory (albeit one lacking in any real evidence) if it weren't for the clear pre-dating of the Scottish references.

An alternative version of this allusory phrase is "the horse of ten toes".



The "Malta Dog," a virulent form of dysentery, When you got it you barked in the corners.

Dont know how true but hey
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Old 2nd Feb 2007, 19:33   #4 (permalink)
 
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Back to square one.....

goes back to the day's before telly, when he pitch was marked out in squares in the newspaper, so the public could follow the match on the radio.

"....and the balls gone back to square one....."




Can I post rude one's on jet blast, can't remember the policy?

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Old 2nd Feb 2007, 19:35   #5 (permalink)
 
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"sayings"

Blue up
Shanks' pony - pass
Malta dog - was what you were bitten by in flight the morning after a night in downtown Valetta in "the Gut", after consumption of copious quantities of Cisk or Hopleaf beer; or (God forbid), Farmers' Wife wine. Usually comprised of the runs interspersed with the odd projectile vomit, both accompanied by the "cheese-wire round the forehead" headache. If you had a good aim you could throw up out the beam lookout window of a Shackleton with little risk of blow-back. Thank the Lord those days are over.
The Ancient Mariner
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Old 2nd Feb 2007, 20:48   #6 (permalink)
 
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How's about...
"He's a little rum 'un
bb
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Old 2nd Feb 2007, 21:34   #7 (permalink)
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'Nowt so queer as folk'.


Brighton?
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Old 2nd Feb 2007, 21:35   #8 (permalink)
 
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Bob's your uncle.
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Old 2nd Feb 2007, 22:19   #9 (permalink)
 
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Is "Shank's pony" similar to "Shank's mare" said in the transatlantic colonies? Meaning to uses one's pedal extremities for locomotion.
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Old 2nd Feb 2007, 22:29   #10 (permalink)
 
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Quote:
...because you'd be up the creek without a paddle
.


Not if you went by this place first.
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Old 2nd Feb 2007, 23:12   #11 (permalink)
 
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there are more ways than killing a cat, than f*cking it to death.

something about choice
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Old 2nd Feb 2007, 23:24   #12 (permalink)
 
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Happy as Larry! Who is Larry, and why is he happy?
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Old 2nd Feb 2007, 23:31   #13 (permalink)
 
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Happy as Larry?,I know! I know! not telling though,one only knows because one has the URL of a website that explains the origins of all these type of phrases,more phrases than yer can shake a stick at.
After all, one is not a spoil sport.

Incidently there are about six differing claims for the origin of "The whole nine yards",five of which have nowt whatsoever to do with machine guns.
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Old 3rd Feb 2007, 08:18   #14 (permalink)

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... and exactly how warm was Luke?
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Old 3rd Feb 2007, 08:24   #15 (permalink)
 
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Bob's your uncle.

Is he?



Tony. Cut n paste? Pleeeeeeeeeeeeeeeease!!!!
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Old 3rd Feb 2007, 08:33   #16 (permalink)
 
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Very well, though one is of the old school and concider resorting to google to be the last resort of the scoundrel.
Larry - certainly the best known character in the world of similes. Most likely to be an Australian or New Zealand expression.

The earliest printed reference currently known is from the New Zealand writer G. L. Meredith, dating from around 1875:

"We would be as happy as Larry if it were not for the rats".

Almost all the other early citations are from Australia or New Zealand. For example, this from Tom Collins (the pen name of the popular Australian writer Joseph Furphy), in Barrier Truth, 1903:

"Now that the adventure was drawing to an end, I found a peace of mind that all the old fogies on the river couldn't disturb. I was as happy as Larry."

larry foleyThere are two commonly repeated contenders for the derivation. One is that it refers to the Australian boxer Larry Foley (1847 - 1917). Foley was a successful boxer who never lost a fight. He retired at 32 and collected a purse of 1,000 for his final fight. So, we can expect that he was known to be happy with his lot in the 1870s - just when the phrase is first cited.

The alternative explanation is that it relates to the Cornish and later Australian/New Zealand slang term larrikin, meaning a rough type or hooligan, i.e. one predisposed to larking about. Larrikin would also have been a term that Meredith would have known. The earliest citation of that is also from New Zealand and also around the time of the first citation, in H. W. Harper's Letters from New Zealand, 1868:

"We are beset with larrikins, who lurk about in the darkness and deliver every sort of attack on the walls and roof with stones and sticks."
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Old 3rd Feb 2007, 09:44   #17 (permalink)
 
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Mind your P's and Q's.

Mind your Pints and Quarts. From publican to his customers when they were getting too rowdy.
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Old 3rd Feb 2007, 09:49   #18 (permalink)
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What about "a nods as good as a wink, to a blind bat"?

Who the farck came up with that?
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Old 3rd Feb 2007, 09:52   #19 (permalink)

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Quote:
Mind your P's and Q's.

Mind your Pints and Quarts. From publican to his customers when they were getting too rowdy.
Or does it have its origins in the printing industry?

Selecting the letters out of the box (probably not the correct technical term), it would be easy to confuse the p's and q's, as each letter is almost the reverse version of the other.
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Old 3rd Feb 2007, 11:02   #20 (permalink)
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So why not bs and ds?
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