View Full Version : Proud of my son


Nick Riviera
26th Aug 2012, 12:04
Being a mother of 2 young boys and also having no sisters, my wife does sometimes bemoan the fact that she has nobody to go girlie shopping with on a whim. Sometimes she can go with a friend but it is not always easy with everyone being busy with family stuff at weekends. She used to go with her mother but unfortunately she died 5 months ago after a long illness. Yesterday she went out shopping and came back quite upset. Turns out that it dawned on her while she was out that her mum wasn't with her. It is small things like that which always bring the loss of a loved one to the fore I always think. She had a little boo when she got home which was noticed by my eldest son, who understood the reason when I explained it to him.

Today my wife has to go out again to buy a birthday present for a friend. On hearing this, number 1 son, who is 10 years old, immediately offered to go with her so that she would not be on her own and "miss not having nanny there" (just to quell any thoughts that perhaps we could all go with her, my youngest is poorly at the moment and I have to stay in to look after him). This from a child who believes that shopping is the ultimate instrument of torture (unless it is for toys!). I was so incredibly proud of him at that moment, especially as we were going to watch Arsenal playing live on telly today, something he always really enjoys doing with his old dad.

So, a silly reason to start a thread, I suppose, but it gladdened my heart.



beaufort1
26th Aug 2012, 12:10
Well I don't think it's a silly reason to start a thread.
If I was in your shoes I would also be very proud of my son.:)
As an aside it's stories like this which gladden the heart and makes me think the current younger generation aren't a lost cause after all. Credit to your wife and yourself in doing an excellent job in raising the youngster. ;)

ENFP
26th Aug 2012, 12:13
There are occasions in parenthood when even the youngest of children can stun you with moments of maturity, sensitivity and wisdom that you would normally only associate with the wise and elderly. How do they do that? I imagine that moment will make today stick in your wife's memory until the end of her days.
Dad needs to return the favour and take number 1 son to a live Arsenal match now ;)

Pugilistic Animus
26th Aug 2012, 12:14
People alway remark about the cruelty of children, but the other side of the coin is that they can also show remarkable empathy and altruism

No doubt you have a good boy [me too] and it's also doubtless that these traits will carry over into manhood...great story:ok:

DX Wombat
26th Aug 2012, 12:17
Nick, he's a lad to be proud of :ok: and like the others I don't think it was silly to start this thread. Well done that lad! You did remember to tell him how proud you are of him didn't you? ;)

probes
26th Aug 2012, 12:31
a child who believes that shopping is the ultimate instrument of torture...
absolutely agree with him - and an extra hug from someone he does not know, delivered by the proud Dad, if i may ask you to do so? :)
They do surprise one in moments of trouble, sometimes, don't they?

hellsbrink
26th Aug 2012, 12:36
So, a silly reason to start a thread, I suppose, but it gladdened my heart.

Absolutely not a silly reason to start a thread, for it is good to know that there are still youngsters out there who have been "brought up proper" despite all the doom and gloom stories seen daily in the press.

Tableview
26th Aug 2012, 12:37
I wish my son was a bit like that.Thoughful. He does think sometimes, but only about what's in it for him.Mine too, but he does have the odd moment when he surprises us by offering to cook for us, however he knows that we rarely accept the offer because his cooking leaves a lot to be desired and he leaves the kitchen in an even worse state than I do.

This from a child who believes that shopping is the ultimate instrument of tortureIt is. There can be no discussion on that point.

con-pilot
26th Aug 2012, 17:04
So, a silly reason to start a thread, I suppose, but it gladdened my heart.

No, not at all. Many times children can be much wiser than their years.












And their parents, trust me on this one. :p








Oh, until they hit the age of 13. :(

Sunnyjohn
26th Aug 2012, 17:12
What a lovely story - thank you for posting it.

I'm sorry that your son does not like shopping, though. I think our family may be a little odd but all the males like shopping to the point where sometimes they are told not to come so that the women can do a girlie shop!

You have a lovely son - be proud of him. I'm sure he's proud of you!

waveskimmer
26th Aug 2012, 17:22
What a cracking thread,I simply cannot add anything to what has been said already, other than respects to your son,and you and your wife. :ok:

heli-cal
26th Aug 2012, 17:27
Well I don't think it's a silly reason to start a thread.
If I was in your shoes I would also be very proud of my son. :)
As an aside it's stories like this which gladden the heart and makes me think the current younger generation aren't a lost cause after all. Credit to your wife and yourself in doing an excellent job in raising the youngster.;)

beaufort1 said it perfectly!

11Fan
26th Aug 2012, 17:42
That's a good lad. :ok:

boguing
26th Aug 2012, 18:45
Be very proud. He's a good 'un.

Big Hammer
26th Aug 2012, 21:28
Well done that lad!

threepeanutpax
26th Aug 2012, 21:33
What a guy!

wingcmdr
26th Aug 2012, 22:48
Nothing finer than a proud Dad and a son to be proud of.

Well done all concerned and long may it continue.

Cheers :ok:

david1300
27th Aug 2012, 04:50
Good to read. Thanks :ok:

Slasher
27th Aug 2012, 07:01
..My little bloke is way too young to handle a rifle but he has a BB gun when
we decide to blast away at the local rabbitry. Since the year dot I've instilled
in him that weapons are used for defence and nothing else, and then only as
a last resort. He knows his mum is trained in the use of my AK's in case she
ever needs to use it and I'm not around.

A crunch came not all that long ago when he wanted to have had a crack at a
bunny with my 22. Was holding on helping his aim from behind when he said
"daddy the little bunny hasn't hurted me so should I make die him?"

"You can make die him only if you intend to eat him afterwards, like the tigers
and lions do on the telly. If you're not going to eat him then you don't die him."

He accepted this as a Law of Nature (as I intended) and we had a nice rabbit
stew that night.

Weeks later there's a paper on the floor opened at a page where some hoon
down in BKK shot an innocent fat bloke in cold blood "for something to do" (so
it read), but the hoon was actually intent on becoming a serial killer.

Little son saw the pics and asked "did that fat man get shotted?"

"Yes mate he did."

"Was the fat man trying hurt?"

"No, he was not a bad man trying to hurt."

"Who that man?" he asked pointing.

"He is the man who shot the fat man."

"Well how will he eat the fat man? He very big man!"

"The man you are pointing at is a bad man. He shot fat man for no reason."

"Will the bad man get shot?"

"No, but he will get punished by getting made die by police."

"You want him made die?"

"Yes mate I do. He's a very very bad man!"

"But why you want him made die? He not hurt me and mummy."


I didn't know whether to bloody laugh or cry...

GGR155
27th Aug 2012, 07:04
Well done....man and boy!