View Full Version : Two-six


alisoncc
6th Apr 2012, 12:52
Hey guys, got a question for the assembled brains. Just been watching this DVD doco about the RN in it's early days, and during the simulation of hauling a sail up the mast, the PO in charge shouted "right then two-six".

Remember a similar use of the expression "two-six" when a) a group of a dozen airmen or so were needed to open a stuck hangar door or b) to move big airies around in a hangar to enable more to be fitted in or c) once a towing tractor had been disengaged final adjustment of aircraft position was undertaken. In essence the "two" was to get ready to push and the "six" was to give it all your worth. So what happened to three, four and five? Or is there a different explanation?

One does get the impression that many here would have verbalized the words as opposed to having needed to act upon them. :p



sitigeltfel
6th Apr 2012, 12:54
Re: Two, Six Heave (http://www.phrases.org.uk/bulletin_board/61/messages/375.html)

crippen
6th Apr 2012, 12:57
"Two, six, heave" is a phrase used to coordinate seamen's pulling. It derives from the orders used in firing shipboard cannons in the British Royal Navy. The team of six men had numbered roles. After loading, it was the task of the men numbered two and six to heave (in a coordinated fashion) the cannon out the gunport for firing, using simple effort for a light cannon or a tackle apiece for larger ones. Shanties not being countenanced in the Royal Navy, "two, six, heave" was pressed into service whenever seamen needed to pull in a coordinated fashion, such as braces and halyards.[1]
In Britain it has a broader meaning and is often used in any situation where a coordinated pulling effort is required, often where maritime people are involved, but almost as frequently where 'civilians' are working together. "Two, six, heave" is a phrase used to coordinate seamen's pulling. It derives from the orders used in firing shipboard cannons in the British Royal Navy. The team of six men had numbered roles. After loading, it was the task of the men numbered two and six to heave (in a coordinated fashion) the cannon out the gunport for firing, using simple effort for a light cannon or a tackle apiece for larger ones. Shanties not being countenanced in the Royal Navy, "two, six, heave" was pressed into service whenever seamen needed to pull in a coordinated fashion, such as braces and halyards.[1]
In Britain it has a broader meaning and is often used in any situation where a coordinated pulling effort is required, often where maritime people are involved, but almost as frequently where 'civilians' are working together."Two, six, heave" is a phrase used to coordinate seamen's pulling. It derives from the orders used in firing shipboard cannons in the British Royal Navy. The team of six men had numbered roles. After loading, it was the task of the men numbered two and six to heave (in a coordinated fashion) the cannon out the gunport for firing, using simple effort for a light cannon or a tackle apiece for larger ones. Shanties not being countenanced in the Royal Navy, "two, six, heave" was pressed into service whenever seamen needed to pull in a coordinated fashion, such as braces and halyards.[1]
In Britain it has a broader meaning and is often used in any situation where a coordinated pulling effort is required, often where maritime people are involved, but almost as frequently where 'civilians' are working together.Two six heave - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Two_six_heave)

alisoncc
6th Apr 2012, 13:01
Wasn't just used by people who messed about in boats, pretty common air force (RAF) expression fifty years ago when I was doing my share of pushing large heavy objects around.

Storminnorm
6th Apr 2012, 15:49
Even though it was used by the Brylcreem boys, the expression
did originate in the Andrew.
I would have thought that it would have needed MORE than just
two matelots to pull a gun out ready for firing. Some of the guns
were a bit heavy.

CathayBrat
6th Apr 2012, 16:49
I would have thought that it would have needed MORE than just
two matelots to pull a gun out ready for firing. Some of the guns
were a bit heavy.
Not really, lots of tackels, winchs, ropes, etc made it easy! Unless you are thinking about the 32 pounder (Pounds, quick, report him to the EU Nazis). They were the lower deck guns, big buggers, then it would take 2 matelots each side to "run out". The combined weight of metal that 1 ship of the line (first rate) could throw in a broadside was roughly more than AW (DofW) ever had in a single battle.
Now it takes more than two to play with her Maj's 4.5 inch!
snigger