View Full Version : Sometimes the French live up to their reputation


AlpineSkier
3rd Apr 2012, 06:40
In these pages - and elsewhere - the French government and police are seen as decisive, fast-acting and vigorous/vicious ( that would be the CRS ).

Generally this seems inappropriate to me as I read plenty of stories about gypsies invading football pitches/farmers' fields, illegal immigrants demonstrating for residence rights and homes with impunity as well as low-level criminals getting numerous cautions etc.

The story below demonstrates a different side where two religious leaders were decided to be unwelcome one day and flown out to Algeria and Mali the next. Three others - two Algerian and one Turkish - are being processed for the same enforced exit.

Le Figaro - France : Un islamiste et un imam expulss (http://www.lefigaro.fr/actualite-france/2012/04/02/01016-20120402ARTFIG00569-un-islamiste-et-un-imam-expulses.php)

The fact that the presidential election is only 20 days away and the murders in Toulouse/Montauban are only two weeks old undoubtedly had a big effect on this, but shows it can be done ( although I don't know if they will be petitioning French justice from their homelands ).

My personal viewpoint is that it shows it can be done and I would like the weak , ineffective UK Home Secretary to take (lots of ) similar decisions instead of refusing to answer direct questions on the matter.



UniFoxOs
3rd Apr 2012, 07:50
Don't think it's the elections being due, they weren't due when he chucked out the pikeys or banned the burka.

Despite hating the frogs for many years I'd vote for Sarkozy if he stood here.

UFO

Sallyann1234
3rd Apr 2012, 08:31
On this occasion the French have shown us what to do.
When the peace and security of their country is threatened, they take action.

We must do the same.

Tableview
3rd Apr 2012, 08:40
I am no supporter or lover of the French but they do get things very right sometimes. In this case .............:D:D:D

Effluent Man
3rd Apr 2012, 09:05
Whilst not disagreeing you should be careful..you might end up before the beak posting things like this.

CelticRambler
3rd Apr 2012, 09:26
He was elected on a promise (one among many) to improve the conditions for businesses and the world of work. In five years, with a government majority behind him, he has done nothing to make it easier to start, run or expand a business. Sure, it's dead easy to get rid of your islamic neighbour, but try shedding even one employee when your turnover drops by 50% ... (well, you shed 'em, but you've still got to pay 'em).

He's in his element right now because of these "security" matters, milking his publicity advantage as head of state and conveniently ignoring the dire economic reality that is France. :*

Blacksheep
3rd Apr 2012, 09:29
I was just thinking about this European Court of Human Rights.
Is France in the same EU as us?

Tableview
3rd Apr 2012, 09:39
He was elected on a promise (one among many) to improve the conditions for businesses and the world of work.

It's been that way for years with French administration. They give with one hand and take back (more) with the other. The reason that so many businesses fail in France is that they offer incentives to startups for the first 2 years and in the third year they ask for it all back. It's all documented but many people fail to make the necessary contingency plans and find themselves in trouble in Y3.

George W Bush reputedly said 'the French have no word for entrepreneur'. Whether he really said it or not is irrelevant, but there's some wisdom in that statement. Few people have the tenacity to successfully fight through and conform with the plethora of badly drafted and often contradictory legislation.

Effluent Man
3rd Apr 2012, 09:50
Many EU countries seem to have this "Blind eye" Attitude.When I was in Spain there was a plethera of cars parked by the kerb in a town,obviously in use,with windscreen wipers missing,light glasses broken and bald tyres.

If you did that here you wouldn't go very long before you got a ticket.It must just be part of the culture I assume.

AlpineSkier
3rd Apr 2012, 10:07
In spite of the pro-Sarkozy comments above, I think he represents the absolute worst-imaginable type of politician. His period of office has only one major achievement - raising the full pension-age by two years: many, many other commitments from 2007 have faded away or were never attempted.

The thing that surprises me most is the hail of new measures he is now proposing more or less every day. If I had the chance , I would ask him : "Why now ? You've had five years to do this and you've done nothing . You are nothing but an opportunistic little shit ".

This when I am obviously not a supporter of the Socialists.

OFSO
3rd Apr 2012, 10:59
When I was in Spain there was a plethera of cars parked by the kerb in a town,obviously in use,with windscreen wipers missing,light glasses broken and bald tyres.

I wonder (a) when that was and (b) where it was. There are so many roadside checks here in Catalunia by the Mossas and Guardia Civil that you wouldn't last long. Punishments are draconian and you can go to prison on a first offence (speeding, alcohol, accident). Even not having the bank receipt for your last car insurance payment in the car at all times costs you an 80 fine and confiscation of the car (happened to my brother-in-law so not hearsay).

Storminnorm
3rd Apr 2012, 11:03
I would hate to be deported back to Manchester.

corsair
3rd Apr 2012, 11:21
Wasn't it the French who referred to the British capital as Londonistan, thanks to the too tolerant attitude shown to Islamic radicals and other undesirables?

The French saw these men as a danger so they got rid of them. Simple as that. They should count themselves lucky the Bastille is no longer a prison. In the old days they would have ended up there with the key thrown away.

I was just thinking about this European Court of Human Rights.
Is France in the same EU as us? Britain take many of these rules far too seriously. Remember the rumour about straight EU bananas? There was furore in Britain about it. Because if it was real it would only have been enforced in Britain. Everywhere else in Europe would probably have ignored it.

Another example the law about displaying weights in metric. Some diehards refused. So were threatened with criminal charges. Most countries would have simply ignored them. Of course it's only the British who are desperately clinging onto the the imperial system for some reason.

When it comes to certain things the French are more pragmatic.

Lon More
3rd Apr 2012, 11:44
In spite of the pro-Sarkozy comments above, I think he represents the absolute worst-imaginable type of politician. His period of office has only one major achievement - raising the full pension-age by two years: many, many other commitments from 2007 have faded away or were never attempted.

Now I know who Camerloon's role model was.

UniFoxOs
3rd Apr 2012, 11:52
Of course it's only the British who are desperately clinging onto the the imperial system for some reason.

Never been to the states, then?

UFO

Storminnorm
3rd Apr 2012, 14:54
Aaahhh, but they have different gallons IIRC ?

(Apart from the fact that they pay about 1/3rd what we do!!!)

corsair
3rd Apr 2012, 16:13
In Europe clearly. The USA is an alternative universe.

Tankertrashnav
3rd Apr 2012, 16:36
It's true about clinging onto the imperial system. In spite of 20 plus years of buying petrol in litres, I'd wager hardly any Brits would express their car's fuel consumption in anything other than miles per gallon. I also noticed when I was teaching, if you asked children who had never learned anything other than the metric system how tall they were, they would inevitably reply "Four foot ten", or whatever. Is it the same in Ireland, Corsair, or have you really gone entirely metric over there?

TZ350
3rd Apr 2012, 16:44
Sarkozy is between a rock and a hard place. Like him or otherwise, at least had the cajones to initiate some positive actions, and by some reports they were not asleep at the wheel, even prior to to the Toulouse murders. I hope the populace will support him.

By shaking the trees, who knows what will fall out, and hopefully the actions will give some other country :rolleyes: the incentive to take similar actions.

It's nice to dream............:hmm:

stuckgear
3rd Apr 2012, 19:08
I was just thinking about this European Court of Human Rights.
Is France in the same EU as us?


it is.

however the difference is that if the UK thumbed its nose at the ECHR, the UK government would get a letter from them telling them how dissapointed they were with us.

That would lead to all kinds of interest groups and the comfy shoe wearers and thier MP's demanding a public inquiry lasting at least two years, at taxpayers expense of course. the meedja would erupt into indigant rage about how the government were engaging in 'ethnic cleansing' and behaving like the third reich etc ect..

the French, just respond with the gallic shrug and carry on regardless.

oldchina
3rd Apr 2012, 19:30
The French can spell their own language, whereas most English speakers can't spell theirs.

stuckgear
3rd Apr 2012, 19:47
The French can spell their own language, whereas most English speakers can't spell theirs.


talking of which, i heard english spoken on the street recently !

BandAide
3rd Apr 2012, 20:35
Before long, the English diaspora, I fear, may be all that's left of Old England, to our loss.

The former English colonies and the Commonwealth, I hope, will be able to carry on and preserve the sterling qualities of life, administration, perspective, and gentility we were given by the English.

It's the best hope for mankind.

TZ350
3rd Apr 2012, 21:16
[quote ] stuckgear
" it is.

however the difference is that if the UK thumbed its nose at the ECHR, the UK government would get a letter from them telling them how dissapointed they were with us.

That would lead to all kinds of interest groups and the comfy shoe wearers and thier MP's demanding a public inquiry lasting at least two years, at taxpayers expense of course. the meedja would erupt into indigant rage about how the government were engaging in 'ethnic cleansing' and behaving like the third reich etc ect..

the French, just respond with the gallic shrug and carry on regardless."

:D:D:D

[quote ] BandAide

The former English colonies and the Commonwealth, I hope, will be able to carry on and preserve the sterling qualities of life, administration, perspective, and gentility we were given by the English.


Could you kind folks give us some back please................sadly ours seems to have disappeared.........:hmm:

galaxy flyer
3rd Apr 2012, 21:55
As a TV commentator in the US once said,

If Montpelier, France were evaporated with a nuclear warhead from Country X, Country X would soon be glass. If, OTOH, Montpelier, Vermont were similarly attacked by Country X, the French PM would ask for a meeting of the UNSC. Point being, France will act for itself, but expects to have a voice in any other country acting on its own.

GF

racedo
3rd Apr 2012, 21:59
As a TV commentator in the US once said,

If Montpelier, France were evaporated with a nuclear warhead from Country X, Country X would soon be glass. If, OTOH, Montpelier, Vermont were similarly attacked by Country X, the French PM would ask for a meeting of the UNSC. Point being, France will act for itself, but expects to have a voice in any other country acting on its own.


Thats funny coming from the US as lets see exactly what has anything that happens outside US 200 mile limit got to do with the US ?

Absolutely nothing but has never stopped them invading, destabilising or overthrowing Government.

Hussar 54
4th Apr 2012, 23:39
Quite simple really....

Where would you prefer to live - France or the UK ?

Lived in France on-and-off for about 25 years now after a couple of short-ish spells in both the UK and France in the late 70's and early 80's....

The daughter lives in the UK and we visit 5 or 6 times each year....And the country seems to detriorate with every visit....I no longer recognise it as the country I enjoyed all those years ago....

The UK now runs the risk that fairly soon it will be a 3rd World country, populated by 3rd world diaspora, and with the major bits of the national infrastructure owned by foreign companies and governments - banks, airports, train and bus operators, gas / electric / water / waste collection utility companies, more and more parts of the Health Services, etc, etc, etc....All essential public services, and now more or less out of the direct control of the UK Government....

Just look at the UK's nuclear energy policy - scuppered because some German company decided not to build two new nuclear power stations - well, at least not until the UK Governement gives in to its blackmailing tactics....

For all its faults, and there are very many of them, I couldn't see these sort of major structural changes being allowed to happen in France - because nothing here changes unless the French themselves want things to change ( not the politicos with their dogma and personal agendas ! ) and so is why I chose to live where I do....

Having said all that, the lifestyle and climate are pretty damned good here, too....

galaxy flyer
5th Apr 2012, 01:19
Racedo

Coming from a subject of the British Empire, that is rich! Care to stack the British historical record of invading and subjugating nations to the US one? Discounting the Taliban government, if you want to call it one as they harbored murderers, we invaded exactly one country, Iraq. A country created by, err, ah, Britain.

Great Britain has invaded, subjugated, overthrown whole continents. He!!, Cecil Rhodes dd more than GWB.

And, how would have Overlord gone as a British only operation? Trite, yes. An answer to your premise, yes.

GF

TZ350
5th Apr 2012, 13:02
quote] galaxy flyer

Great Britain has invaded, subjugated, overthrown whole continents. He!!, Cecil Rhodes dd more than GWB. [quote]

But now they no longer have an " empire " , they have created an internal Governmental one, funded by their own subjugatedpopulace, modelled on the Stasi. :mad:

I'm English by birth, sadly.:uhoh:

Hussar 54, don't tell the truth, you'll upset the " Great Britain " fantasists .

sitigeltfel
5th Apr 2012, 13:18
Care to stack the British historical record of invading and subjugating nations to the US one?

The US of A has only been around for a few hundred years.

Give it time, sir.........give it time!

Storminnorm
5th Apr 2012, 13:31
I'd just like to say that "Great" Britain just refers to the whole
of the British Isles. ie, Greater Britain. NOT to our own opinion
of how wonderful we all are here. A commonly held mis-conception.

TZ350
5th Apr 2012, 13:38
Storminorm, sadly , people of your rational outlook are now the silent minority...................you can't speak out as it will be illegal under the UK " laws ":mad: .

radeng
5th Apr 2012, 14:18
Imagine Africa without British colonisation. It would still be tribal, still living in mud huts, very high infant death rate, low life expectancy. Polio, smallpox, diptheria, malaria etc running rife. Tribes fighting each othr to capture women and cattle - many of the latter pretty scrubby things, and to take slaves to sell to the Arabian slave traders. Little empires would rise and fall with those in power getting everything and the rest subjugated and starving - look at Zimbabwe.

Now compare with what happened in the Congo when the Belgians just pulled out. There hasn't been any real peace there since, as they didn't try to hand over an opertaing governmental system.

So how did the US get the Philippines? They didn't invade in the eastern Mediterranean in about 1811? Or Cuba in 1901 or so?

El Grifo
5th Apr 2012, 14:25
Working in Morroco right now and on my travels around the country, noticed very few female schoolkids wearing head covering.

Where I live within the EC, more and more kids are seen coming out of school wearing same !

When my wife asked me why this could be, I replied, "Morroco is already principally muslim. There is no need to make an obvious presence in order to effect or push change "

Was I in any way accurate ?

Tableview
5th Apr 2012, 14:32
Tut tut Radeng ... you'll have the Fluffies after you for speaking the truth.

PS You forgot AIDS, corruption, tribal warfare, genocide .............

galaxy flyer
5th Apr 2012, 16:05
I see, Congo was a tropical paradise under Belgian rule. How silly of me.

GF

racedo
5th Apr 2012, 19:17
Coming from a subject of the British Empire, that is rich!

And your proof I am a British subject comes from where exactly ?

I detest empires and everything they stand for.....that should be pretty obvious on here

As for Invasions are we just talking about the ones by Regular US forces or by Paramilitary forces aided and support by CIA / NSA etc

Just use the obvious ones
Cuba bay of Pigs .....................Bush oil company aided and abetted by CIA
Grenada
Panama
Somalia
Haiti
Iraq
Afghanistan

I will avoid all the rest as list is long

CelticRambler
6th Apr 2012, 19:17
Getting back to the French ... Our Glorious Leader is making capital from the expulsion in recent weeks of a few select individuals. Not many commentators here (in France) seem to remember that this is the same executive head of state that created a whole new revenue stream for the Roma community.

Beautifully simple: you set yourself up in a caravan or cardboard box of your choice in Paris. The Government, in a window-dressing exercise, incentivise you to return home with a significant cash payment and a one-way airline ticket. You take it; you wait three to six months; then hitch a ride back to your van/box in Paris with new id papers and wait for your next incentive.

As a result of the multi-million euro initiative, the total Roma population over the last five years has reduced by approximately ... nothing (give or take a few that jumped on a truck to England).

Tankertrashnav
6th Apr 2012, 21:57
It may be a trivial point, but let's get this "British Subject" business sorted out:


British Citizens are not British Subjects under the 1981 Act. The only circumstance where a person may be both a British Subject and British citizen simultaneously is a case where a British Subject connected with Ireland (s. 31 of the 1981 Act) acquires British citizenship by naturalisation or registration. In this case only, British Subject status is not lost upon acquiring British citizenship.
The status of British Subject cannot now be transmitted by descent, and will become extinct when all existing British Subjects are dead.


So since 1981 all we British-born Brits are now in fact British Citizens. Only those who were originally Irish can call also themselves British Subjects, which must be a source of undying satisfaction to them ;)

parabellum
7th Apr 2012, 00:13
I think it is correct to say that during the French involvement in Vietnam 100% of the rankers in the Legion were foreign nationals and only the officers were French, not so today.

thing
7th Apr 2012, 00:35
It changed my view (naturally coloured by the UKs WWII experience/ Folklore) of yer average Froggy!

Napoleon did alright with them. He was French as well (OK Corsican). Even The Duke admitted that Waterloo was a 'damn close run thing' and if it hadn't been for Blucher turning up at the right moment after being trapped under his horse for some time and seriously wounded then we would all be garlic eaters. Such things are empires built on.