View Full Version : Mensa


Parapunter
30th Sep 2010, 10:48
Clever people innit?

There's a fair few bright chaps & ladies around here, anyone a member or thought about it? I took the Mensa home test & subsequently have been invited to sit an invigliated entry exam, Pure ego for me, to see if I'm like as smart like as I like reckon I might, like be 'n stuff.

I find the tests are predictable to a degree in the sense that they follow certain patterns such as prime numbers, graduated multiplication and so on, so it's questionable whether they test pure intelligence or minds that are tuned into tests.

Is it worth being in though? other than the bragging rights?



Captain Stable
30th Sep 2010, 10:55
If anyone to whom I was chatting in the pub came up with the line "I'm in Mensa, you know", I think my reaction would be the thought "What a tosser" and take my pint elsewhere...

Slasher
30th Sep 2010, 11:04
I flog around a A320.

Thats a intelligence test in itself and more dificult than any bloodey Mensa exam!

I agree with Stable - the few Mensa tossers Ive met tend to
like w@<hidden> off in public and think everyones impressed -
like modern day Nobel Prize winners. :rolleyes:

Metro man
30th Sep 2010, 11:10
Go for it, I did. It's something useful to put on a CV, and there are lots of special interest groups. Regular social gatherings are held which you might enjoy.

You can have a MENSA email address and buy the usual promotional mugs, T shirts etc.:ok:

Storminnorm
30th Sep 2010, 11:12
The Mensa test is only an IQ test.
It's nothing special. A bit like the old 11 plus exam.
And that was a doddle for us Geniuses.

Slasher
30th Sep 2010, 11:15
I was told that crucifixion was a doddle.

Isnt it?

Forkandles
30th Sep 2010, 11:16
... Regular social gatherings are held which you might enjoy.:ok:

My Lord, that must be like a back stage party at a Marilyn Manson gig. Sign me the **** up!

Storminnorm
30th Sep 2010, 11:16
Don't make me cross now Slasher.

Parapunter
30th Sep 2010, 11:17
http://i56.tinypic.com/2h67kzm.gif

Slasher
30th Sep 2010, 11:18
Sorry uncle Norm...... :oh:

Storminnorm
30th Sep 2010, 11:22
That's OK Slasher.
Thanks for that Parapunter!! Brilliant.

603DX
30th Sep 2010, 11:24
I suspect that the membership is comprised solely of the sort of people who aspire to impress themselves. If they also seek to impress others with their declared membership, IMHO they negate any claim to intelligence.

I believe the entry level is approximately equivalent to an IQ two standard deviations above average, measured by an established test such as the Stanford-Binet*. Apparently only about 2% of the population score this high, and I would have thought that anyone who has taken the test and achieved this sort of result would best serve themselves by keeping quiet about it. No-one likes a smart-arse. :)

* Edited to add links: http://www.iqcomparisonsite.com/IQBasics.aspx

http://www.iqcomparisonsite.com/criteria.aspx

sea oxen
30th Sep 2010, 11:29
Slasher
the few Mensa tossers Ive met tend to
like w@<hidden> off in public

You'd change your tune if you met a cute female member. :)

SO

The SSK
30th Sep 2010, 11:31
What is intelligence?

According to my psychology prof at university, the answer is
'That which is measured by intelligence tests'.

I'm with Slasher, intelligence is as intelligence does.

B Fraser
30th Sep 2010, 11:35
Mensa held a group outing to a farm that produced their own cider in Somerset. The place was festooned with temporary Mensa signs pointing their members in the direction of the bottling plant. I would have thought they would have appreciated the challenge of having no signs whatsoever but there you go.

Mentally Enhanced Nerds Sodding About.

Being a member of the ten times a night club would give far greater bragging rights.

;)

Storminnorm
30th Sep 2010, 11:41
I don't think there are MANY cute female members of Mensa.
There ARE female members though. But CUTE? I think, Mmmm?

Airborne Aircrew
30th Sep 2010, 11:42
I used to hang out in a pub that had a weekly MENSA "gathering"... They were the people everyone took one look at and moved quietly to the other side of the pub. One of them was a colleague from a sister organization to the one that employs me and worked in my field, (IT). The number of times I had to explain what were fairly simple things to him, (often several times), convinced me that intelligence as a measured entity is about as useful as looking at the size of a man's feet to determine if he's well hung or not.

Slasher
30th Sep 2010, 11:45
I cant see the intelligence of boasting membership of
MENSA when the intelligent thing to do is to just shutup
about it and not piss people off unless there is an
intelligent need to do so (such as on a relavant resume
for examp)

Anyway lve often mulled about Education - Intelligence -
Wisdom. Imagine each represented as a circle. Questions
are can these 3 coexist together? Can any 2 bisect each
other? Can there be a trisection where all 3 merge?

Education could probabley enhance intelligence by getting
otherwise lazey neurons working. Then again could
wisdom and education (each standing alone) enhance
intelligence? In other words could a wise old fart be the
dumbest dork on earth? Or a well educated but unwise
bloke have gifted intelligence far above any MENSA
member? I think of Einstein for example and believe he'd
flop a MENSA exam badley.

tony draper
30th Sep 2010, 12:13
Save yourself the trouble just buy a mensa badge off ebay.:rolleyes:

sea oxen
30th Sep 2010, 12:13
Storminnorm

Were she (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hedy_Lamarr) merely 50 years younger, I'd go for it.

I do not think that intelligence in a woman is inversely proportional to her looks, otherwise Harriet Harman would be a Nobel laureate and Susan Boyle would design nuclear reactors. Mrs SO would be as daft as a - oh, hang on...

SO

Mechta
30th Sep 2010, 12:25
The crux of it is that people admire wisdom or common sense far more than they admire so called 'intelligence'.

As the other posters have said, telling people that you have any of these, shows that you don't.

Standard Noise
30th Sep 2010, 12:29
Took the tests a couple of years ago in a hotel in Bath. There were a Six Nations match on in the bar next door, I couldn't concentrate properly!

Parapunter
30th Sep 2010, 12:37
But did you pass?


Can I point out for the sensitive skinned that bragging rights are very different from bragging. Thank you, back to the Khmer Rouge.:)

Standard Noise
30th Sep 2010, 12:41
No, came in just under the pass mark overall. According to them I'm in the mid 130s, not good enough to be an anorak!

Hydromet
30th Sep 2010, 13:14
After reading all the above, I'm still none the wiser.... but perhaps I'm better informed.:rolleyes:

sitigeltfel
30th Sep 2010, 13:20
I've met a few so called "brain the size of a planet" characters, but I doubt that they had an ounce of common sense between them.

Mechta
30th Sep 2010, 13:46
If you've read the above book, which is written in the first person about a boy who has Asperger's Syndrome, or you are familiar with the syndrome anyway, then you will know that people with the syndrome are often capable of solving complex mathematical and other problems with comparative ease, but usually have poor social skills.

Evidently there are parallels with people with high Mensa scores, so perhaps we should regard them in the same way, i.e. 'not better, not worse than me, just different'.

corsair
30th Sep 2010, 13:59
I did the Mensa test years ago and qualified apparently being in the top two percentile of the population. Other tests I've done place me just below genius level.

All of this is a great explanation for why I'm socially maladjusted, couldn't string a coherent conversation together unless drink is involved, have no career to speak of and being described as 'odd' even by my wife. Perhaps I should join after all?:)

Many is the time I have been accused of being intelligent. It's an all together useless thing unless you have a talent. That's the key, having a talent and intelligence. But a talent is more useful. So it's better to talented than intelligent.

I've come across people who hide their intelligence for the most part. I think that's really clever to pull off.

In my opinion the dumber you are the happier you are.:ok:

tony draper
30th Sep 2010, 14:04
I sent for the test but could not figure out how to open the envelope.:(

Parapunter
30th Sep 2010, 14:05
A good head and a good heart are always a formidable combination. Nelson Mandela.

Tankertrashnav
30th Sep 2010, 14:21
My son's wife is a Mensa member (in Holland, she's Dutch) and she drags him off to Mensa weekends every now and then. Son says they are absolutely dire with some of the weirdest people you can imagine. (Mind you I'm not that impressed with his mrs!).

Corsair, dont do yourself down, Ive always thought you spoke a lot more sense than a lot on here:ok:

BlueDiamond
30th Sep 2010, 14:29
Did the supervised test years ago in the U.K. out of curiosity. Like corsair ... passed and classified "top two percent." Rarely discuss it and have told very few people ... err, up to now that is. :O It was a "personal satisfaction" thing and I didn't bother keeping up the membership and never wore the badge.

Have a crack at it, para ... you'll enjoy the challenge.

rgbrock1
30th Sep 2010, 14:40
Mechta wrote:
If you've read the above book, which is written in the first person about a boy who has Asperger's Syndrome, or you are familiar with the syndrome anyway, then you will know that people with the syndrome are often capable of solving complex mathematical and other problems with comparative ease, but usually have poor social skills.

My son, who is 12 years old, was diagnosed with Asperger's Syndrome many years ago. He has made great progress in school and in his environment since then. However, his social skills are still not up to par: he prefers his own company and withdrawing into himself. However, he has been tested in Mathematics and has been found to have the analytical thinking, in Maths anyway, of a post-grad student. There is not a mathematical problem which he cannot solve. In short order. It is truly mind-boggling to see him work mathematical formulas and come up with solutions.

Lon More
30th Sep 2010, 14:44
I wouldn't join any club that would have me

spInY nORmAn
30th Sep 2010, 16:41
My tendency is to run counter to the 'superior than thou" attitude of the MENSA types, ergo I have applied to join DENSA - the name speaks for itself. Information about DENSA and the benefits of membership can be found here: Densa: The Low I.Q. Society - brought to you by your friends at Bound & Gags! (http://home.comcast.net/~czell/densa.htm)

wings folded
30th Sep 2010, 17:27
I sent for the test but could not figure out how to open the envelope


There was I thinking that only Americans "figured things out", whereas the rest of us work things out.

Has America taken over the northeast? Have you been alienated Mr D?

Please revert to normality sharpish, or I may get depressed.

SpringHeeledJack
30th Sep 2010, 17:38
Many is the time I have been accused of being intelligent. It's an all together useless thing unless you have a talent. That's the key, having a talent and intelligence. But a talent is more useful. So it's better to talented than intelligent.

I've come across people who hide their intelligence for the most part. I think that's really clever to pull off.

In my opinion the dumber you are the happier you are

There's nothing wrong with being intelligent and 'never achieving anything', it is yours to use or not, you might not even be special, it might have just come through to you from your forefather's genes. However we live in a materialistic world and it's always a shame not to be able to use intellectual intelligence to earn a crust. Therin lies the rub, how to bring one's intelligence to market in a form that brings both pleasure and reward.

What is that quote, something like "An unexamined life is not worth living" ? I can't recall who said it, some fillysoper from yesteryear. Anyway, being more aware than the average joe does make life more complicated as you lament on our existence in it's many forms and the relation we have within and to it. Being 'dumb' is rather like arrested development or being a child, you aren't aware of much outside your little circle of life and therefore you can live happily (subjective, i know) because the other happenings don't cross your path, except in extreme circumstances.

I'd rather have an aware life than a blinkered opiate of the masses life anytime. If the OP want's to join MENSA, then he should, why not ? I've been to a couple of meetups (not invited) and the social/emotional depths were lacking, at least in my experience. Should help on the CV though :ok:



SHJ

Led Balloon
30th Sep 2010, 17:45
That may have been Socrates - being more aware certainly did make life a tad more complicated for him... :ouch:

Storminnorm
30th Sep 2010, 17:48
Gill was on our Pub Quiz team. She was in Mensa.
Ex Headmistress I believe.
But I knew a lot more about Football, Rugby,Cricket and Boxing
than she did.

waveskimmer
30th Sep 2010, 18:17
I fully concur capstab:ok:

603DX
30th Sep 2010, 18:20
Sounds like a well balanced pub quiz team, Norm. The ones that do well often have a good mix of people with all sorts of accomplishments, in my experience. High intelligence (as allegedly measured by IQ testing) has a lot in common with low cunning, a useful attribute in general knowledge quizzes when the right answer can sometimes be worked out using logic or intuition from the wording of the question. If the team also has a good age spread and one or two with in-depth knowledge of sport, music, films, etc., they can be pretty hard to beat! ;)

Parapunter
30th Sep 2010, 18:23
I note with interest one contributor's dislike of bragging. He had to stop posting about his endless sexual prowess for five minutes in order to do so.:}

BAMRA wake up
30th Sep 2010, 18:28
I couldn't get in to mensa so I'm applying to densa.

Molemot
30th Sep 2010, 18:32
"See the happy moron; he doesn't give a damn!


I wish I were a moron.


MY GOD!


Perhaps I am."

bearfoil
30th Sep 2010, 18:37
My daughter was dating a Mensa lad, and I (we) were invited to dinner. Certificates of membership (Mensaship?) adorned the chap's home, and he didn't wait two minutes after greeting us to inform us of his IQ "Status". Upon being informed, I said, "Thank you, I couldn't have guessed". The evening went badly.

I will admit to some irritation at his bragging, and for an embarrassing reason. Having been told I possessed a genius IQ when at school, I was tempted to say so. I didn't, in any case, I think it helped me little in life's pursuits. Of all things there are to know, the most important is people.

Knowledge plus experience = Wisdom.

Most prized in a group is to be wise. Second most prized is to appear so. Hence the birth of the politician.

bear

Lance Murdoch
30th Sep 2010, 19:00
I did the MENSA entrance test when I was 18 and passed. I was a member for a while but never bothered going to social gatherings etc.

I don't think that there is any harm in joining but probably not a good thing to put on the CV. Everyone you come across either thinks that you are a genius (which Im not) or a smartarse (which Ive learnt not to be). At best it is neutral, at worst people will hold it against you.

As others said success in life is about much more than completing IQ tests. I think that the optimum level of intelligence is circa the top 10%. That way you can do well academically and go into what career you want but not get bored as quickly as someone more intelligent nor be smart enough at a very young age to realise that the boss is an idiot.

Parapunter
30th Sep 2010, 19:12
I couldn't agree more Lance. My reasons for contemplating taking the test is to satisfy my own curiosity & to lord it over my brother (and no one else). My brother incidentally left school with two gce's & now has a net worth of around 7-8 million quid after a hugly successful career in business, so passing a mensa test proves naff all about an individual save for a strong bent towards numerical & literal reasoning.

M.Mouse
30th Sep 2010, 19:43
Years ago I took the invigilated test and (just) qualified for membership. I didn't bother joining because I had really only taken the tests out of curiosity and also feel that as a group MENSA are a bit nerdy. IQ or mental agility/ability has little relation to common sense, probably the least common of all senses!

I can be incredibly quick on the uptake with logic and deduction but by the same token incredibly slow in other less cut and dried situations. In verbal argument my thinking is agonisingly slow. On other occasions I can be incredibly stupid (actually I made that up).

What really sums up MENSA is that Sir Clive Sinclair is a member and he invented the Sinclair C5: Sinclair C5 Enthusiasts (http://www.sinclairc5.com)

sitigeltfel
30th Sep 2010, 20:00
In my opinion the dumber you are the happier you are Forrest Gump would concur :ok:

rgbrock1
30th Sep 2010, 20:14
Quote:

In my opinion the dumber you are the happier you areOr, Ignorance is Bliss.

Explains a lot really.

He couldn't get out of bed in the morning
He thought it was just a drag
So into his hollow mind he was calling, into his hollow mind
March on you fools and keep the line
March on you fools don't fall behind

From the distance through the silence
If you listen you hear sirens

Outside my window they walk in a line
Asking no questions and reading no signs

Where there is smoke there might be fire
No kiss goodnight
From the distance through the silence
If you listen you hear sirens

G-CPTN
30th Sep 2010, 20:19
skU-jBFzXl0

larssnowpharter
30th Sep 2010, 20:19
As many have alluded to or mentioned directly, the tests you do to illustrate your IQ test only a small part of your capacity as a human being. Do be complete, their are many other factors. That incalculable thing 'wisdom' has been mentioned.

Many who score highly are social misfits or unable to function effectively within an organizaton. I know; I am one and struggle at times.

A better indication of people being 'successful' is something called Emotional Intelligence. Now, one of the great things about EI is that you can improve it and apply lessons. You may even be considered 'wise'.

The really clever folks are those who manage to combine a high IQ with a high Emotional Intelligence quotient.

Just my thoughts on an interesting topic.

yakker
30th Sep 2010, 20:41
There is a few females on this page The IQ of Famous People - Famous People With High IQ's (http://www.kids-iq-tests.com/famous-people.html) that would have me interested in joining Mensa.

Gingie
30th Sep 2010, 21:02
Asia Carrera studied piano as a child, and had performed twice at Carnegie Hall before she was 15, she also won a full academic scholarship to Rutgers University and is a member of Mensa.

Just be careful if you google her.

BandAide
30th Sep 2010, 21:29
I would never apply to Mensa as I'm surely not smart enough, and the rejection would be devastating to my already fragile ego.

Best wishes to those who get the ticket, though. I'm sure you'll enjoy the exquisite company you are certain to keep as you actualize your potential.

Loose rivets
30th Sep 2010, 21:51
I looked at the link and it left me longing to know more. What an amazing mixture of fortune.

Keef
30th Sep 2010, 22:12
I only know a few Mensa members, and I have to say they aren't the sort of folks I'd want to join a club with.

I've met very very few people who would be impressed at the IQ of the person telling them. I keep very quiet about mine (so would you!).

tailstrikecharles
30th Sep 2010, 22:48
it has always been and will continue to be so.

When the Smart ones become foolish is when they fail to appreciate the social and cumulative power of "The Stupids"

The Smarts are smart enough to go it alone, the stupids know they cant, so they develop techniques such as brute force, persistence and 'team building'.

Always pretend to know less than you do, and you will be better (and safer) for it! :D

sea oxen
30th Sep 2010, 22:51
yakker

Viz published a reader's letter where he described his desire to watch a football game whilst doing something I dare not mention to one of the ladies featured on that page - while she filled out his tax return. This was in the 'Borderline Boilers' feature some years ago.

I was sent to a different school because I passed an IQ test. Many years later, I found that many of my friends had done the same thing (albeit at other schools). This is only anecdotal, but I cannot remember any misfits.

It's fashionable to say that people with a high IQ find it difficult to adapt, but it would not be unreasonable to expect the same or worse of someone with the mind of a ten year old. Unless he's ten or younger, that is.

SO

tony draper
30th Sep 2010, 22:58
Said it before, I suspect true genius is a very rare form of Autism,not quite as severe as being a Idiot Savant which is the extreme but close.
One must pen a learned paper on this sometime but alas it will have to join the pile of other learned papers one has in the pipeline awaiting one's pen at the mo..
:rolleyes:

parabellum
30th Sep 2010, 23:06
Read a book by a Prof. H.J. Eysenck once called 'Know Your Own IQ'. In the preface he made it very clear that IQ was only a measure of potential and a high IQ didn't automatically mean that intelligence would be applied etc. or that a high IQ would mean academic success or, indeed, any other kind of success!

Rule3
1st Oct 2010, 00:05
A man with Common Sense is worth 10 with intelligence.
A woman with Presence is worth 10 with beauty.
A woman with common sense is like Santa Claus, a figment of your imagination.:ouch:

ExSp33db1rd
1st Oct 2010, 00:25
don't think there are MANY cute female members of Mensa.
There ARE female members though. But CUTE? I think, Mmmm?

My wife and I NEVER see things the same way, glass half full, half empty or glass too large ? syndrome.

She's both Mensa and American, so not sure if these facets cancel each other out or are cumulative ?

She's quite cute tho'

fitliker
1st Oct 2010, 01:26
The Star Trekkie conventions are full of mensa types:total entertainment to watch someone with a high IQ paying to get their picture taken with the cast of a sixties space tv show:}

V2-OMG!
1st Oct 2010, 02:59
I'm embarrassed to admit that I took the application exam and passed (but just barely).

Somehow, being the stupidest of the smart didn't strike me as being much of an accomplishment.

Other things are far more important.

Tinstaafl
1st Oct 2010, 04:37
I've met a number of cute Mensans. The world gathering held in Orlando a few years ago had quite a few wandering around. The unlimited free beer in the hospitality pavilion wasn't bad either!

Load Toad
1st Oct 2010, 04:39
Dear Mother (she's 65 y' know) recently took the test and was measured at an IQ of 158. Not bad - she said she'd been invited to some Mensa do or other but she wasn't interested as it clashed with cake decorating classes.

Charlie Foxtrot India
1st Oct 2010, 05:14
Did the test years ago and passed, my sister is a member and took me to a Mensa gathering to see if I wanted to do the next test...I decided it wasn't for me and continued with the rock and roll lifestyle instead.

Like my sister, nearly of all them were classic "Aspies". Lovely people but see the world and its inhabitants quite differently to most! Certainly never heard any of them bragging about thier membership, I would think that behaviour was more for the "walts". Sister puts photos of Mensa gatherings on Facebook and they seem to have some good fun!

HKPAX
1st Oct 2010, 05:20
Eysenck this thread has gone on long enough

sirwa69
1st Oct 2010, 05:48
I'm a member and so's my sister :O
Many years ago I got a Mensa branded credit card and I have never bothered to change it. The good news is that the balance on it is zero and will probably remain so for quite some time :O:O

Loose rivets
1st Oct 2010, 06:30
When the Bloxors craze started (for me, thanks to PpruNe) I found it easy. It was mechanical in nature and I could hardly wait for the next session. However, the IQ tests I fail on, are the ones with the curled up string. For some reason, I can't unravel it in my mind.

Many, many people had passed a crate with a RR Dart in it, when I backed up and started to examine it. I called a couple of engineers who stared at it in amazement. It had obviously rolled onto something before being lacquered. Masses of small objects were bent. The bending was minuscule and had been missed by (presumably) several skilled people, but this kind of thing is quickly obvious to me

However, spelling never has been, no matter how hard I tried.

The machine control of cars and aircraft was 'obvious' - it just seemed to do what I wanted - well, most times.:sad: But looking back, I was a terrible airline pilot, just couldn't fit in with convention and SOPs. I would have loved to put my mind to improving aircraft rather than getting them from A to B. I don't think an inquiring mind is much good at dull routine, but I also think it's hard to find a place in this quantified world for people thinking outside the box.

blue up
1st Oct 2010, 08:01
My sister, Professor of Molecular Biology, has an IQ of 174. She phoned me a couple of years ago to ask me to help with her car. The oil light had been on for many weeks and she finally decided to top it up. "How the **** do you get a gallon of oil down that tiny tube? Must've been designed by an idiot!"
I told here that she needed to pour it very slowly.:ok:




143, by the way.

Bruce Wayne
1st Oct 2010, 10:18
There was I thinking that only Americans "figured things out", whereas the rest of us work things out.



A friend of mine is a mathematician. When he had constipation he worked out the problem with a pencil.

corsair
1st Oct 2010, 14:11
I don't think an inquiring mind is much good at dull routine, but I also think it's hard to find a place in this quantified world for people thinking outside the box.I would agree there rivets. It's hard to fit in when you are constantly seeing things 'differently'.

yakker
1st Oct 2010, 14:19
Intelligence and common sense do not go hand in hand. But have I met a few people that were blessed with both. Now they are smart.

Slasher
1st Oct 2010, 14:42
Intelligence and common sense do not go hand in hand

Especialy in Quantum Physics yakker. In fact everyday commonsense is
actualy a handicap and only ones inteligence can help one understand it.

yakker
1st Oct 2010, 15:16
Agreed.

The people I refered to were both engineers, and designed world beating race engines.

Pugilistic Animus
1st Oct 2010, 15:26
I don't worry too much about it; I just do my work, many folks have asked me to take an IQ test but.never took the test, although some have speculated about my IQ, I tell them I don't care:rolleyes:...don't wanna be limited or overrated [i.e made all 'high and mighty'] by some number...besides Mensa is on the ground and thus useless to me:E

My sister, Professor of Molecular Biology, has an IQ of 174
are her initials EMC?...if yes, then that lady is brilliant:eek:....had her for molecular bio, cell and molecular techniques:zzz: and developmental:eek::\:eek::ugh::\


:)

Pugilistic Animus
1st Oct 2010, 16:41
Asia Carrera studied piano as a child, and had performed twice at Carnegie Hall before she was 15, she also won a full academic scholarship to Rutgers University and is a member of Mensa.

She went on later to play flute:E

tailstrikecharles
1st Oct 2010, 17:15
I don't worry too much about it; I just do my work, many folks have asked me to take an IQ test but.never took the test, although some have speculated about my IQ, I tell them I don't care

After reading some of your posts, I too have speculated about your IQ, my erudite friend!
I am quite sure it is 1010 or 1011!*





*Of course, I only count in binary.....

I'll be here all week! Also doing parties and weddings and some funerals

visibility3miles
1st Oct 2010, 17:27
I have known dyslexics who were very bright but could barely pass high school or a community college (two year program), let alone a four year college program. They were all extremely good with their hands and wound up being automotive mechanics or excellent electronic technicians. They could understand engines or circuitry quite well.

Their IQ wasn't the problem, it was their reading skills that were sorely lacking due to some quirk in the brain.

Wonderful people.

Pugilistic Animus
1st Oct 2010, 17:34
~ 171...ok:)

I think dyslexia is when both sides of the brain fight...you have to teach yourself little games...to survive; I think many pilots are slightly dyslexic...It does not matter as pilots are not supposed to be too smart:ooh:; I mean it's best to simply listen to Lester otherwise one may just end up like Watkins nevertheless:E

Pugilistic Annoying Mouse...Funny, still better then some other variants...
I left myself wide open with my handle:}:}:}

Pugilistic Animus
1st Oct 2010, 19:07
u8XlZWqb7FA

mSqltiTvbTc&feature=fvw


just do your work....:)

Pugilistic Animus
1st Oct 2010, 19:38
http://www.pprune.org/tech-log/418855-definition-ground-speed-3.html

post 85.....this thread;.it's a funny read ----only BumpyFlite was not confused at all:}:}:}

lexxity
1st Oct 2010, 22:01
Slasher said

I agree with Stable - the few Mensa tossers Ive met tend to
like w@<hidden> off in public and think everyones impressed -
like modern day Nobel Prize winners.

At least they'd be smart enough to keep the superglue away from that area. :E


Slasher do you hate us?

Loose rivets
1st Oct 2010, 22:25
"How the **** do you get a gallon of oil down that tiny tube? Must've been designed by an idiot!"

Reminds me of the blond that went into the service shop and said, "My Seven Ten is missing."

Parapunter
1st Oct 2010, 22:32
Or the one who took her car in & was told by the spanners; shit in the carburettor.

Really? How often do I have to do that?

ExSp33db1rd
1st Oct 2010, 23:28
......I does not matter as pilots are not supposed to be too smart

Flt. Engineers have to be able to do sums, Co-pilots have to be able to write, but Captains only need to know someone who can read.

mini
2nd Oct 2010, 00:45
My Missus got dragged into this Mensa lark whilst she was at Uni in Liverpool (Swanky eh?) Never an active member, she still managed to drag me into doing the "test"

Load of Cobblers IMHO

I have always recruited for attitude and trained accordingly, in my business, never failed yet. :)

sea oxen
2nd Oct 2010, 01:19
Loose Rivets

Reminds me of the blond

That's a man with blond hair.

What's the difference between a blonde and a blond? The blonde has a higher sperm count.

SO

(Mrs SO, who is a blonde, is just seven feet away from me. Please tell Mother I died bravely.)

Slasher
2nd Oct 2010, 01:40
Slasher do you hate us?

No Lexx I hate super glue! :mad:

Its banned from the house now - Id rather use the old genital friendley takes-24-hours-to-dry stuff.

sea oxen
2nd Oct 2010, 09:08
Lexxity
At least they'd be smart enough to keep the superglue away from that area.

I find it quite annoying when the tube becomes stuck to my nose.

SO

Tempsford
2nd Oct 2010, 14:33
The mathmetician with constipation 'worked it out' with a pencil.

I will get my coat.....

Hydromet
2nd Oct 2010, 22:56
Was that because he couldn't budget.