View Full Version : Legality of a PPL Question bank???


Rocketraz
8th Feb 2010, 22:13
Now that the Confuser (could??) Be finished is there any legal reason why someone could not start a PPL question bank??. Or is it true that you are just not allowed to publish the exact exam questions that are in the exams??

Anyone know for sure??



liam548
8th Feb 2010, 22:58
There are already PPL question banks out there. The confuser did not have the exact questions as the exams, only similar.

Rocketraz
9th Feb 2010, 13:04
Really and where are these to be found????

Whirlygig
9th Feb 2010, 13:18
There are several books and a few software CDs available. Try Transair, Pooleys, Flightstore, Amazon et al ....

Let me google that for you (http://tinyurl.com/yjdt2pw)


Or is it true that you are just not allowed to publish the exact exam questions that are in the exams?? That would seem to imply that you believe there to be a central, official database of PPL questions. Well, there ain't!

Cheers

Whirls

liam548
10th Feb 2010, 15:57
airquiz has PPL question banks. Search google for airquiz, you have to pay though.

Saab Dastard
10th Feb 2010, 16:58
That would seem to imply that you believe there to be a central, official database of PPL questions. Well, there ain't!

I assume that there is one, actually - the one holding the questions that are used in the actual exams! I seem to recall that there are at least 3 - possibly 4 - papers for each subject to allow for re-takes, so there must be a "database" of questions for each subject.

SD

mad_jock
10th Feb 2010, 17:45
There are 3 sets for each exam. They are held by a ground school examiner who is responsable for them and in theory they should never leave his sight unless secure.

Every so often (about every three years) they rewrite them and issue a new set to each examiner they then usually have to again after a couple of months because there will be that many complaints about certain questions.

I suspect what you would call a bank is actually a lump of A4 dumped in the back of a filing cabinet which see's day light every three years for a week.

juliet india mike
10th Feb 2010, 20:11
Can be downloaded as an Iphone app from here
iPhone Apps (http://www.thegreatcircle.co.uk/iphoneapps/)

Another reason to justify having Apple's finest on your person at all times

liam548
11th Feb 2010, 17:13
Can be downloaded as an Iphone app from here
iPhone Apps (http://www.thegreatcircle.co.uk/iphoneapps/)

Another reason to justify having Apple's finest on your person at all times


so many flying apps for the iphone!!

Cant think of one for Nokia/Symbian phones! :(

OpenCirrus619
11th Feb 2010, 17:22
I googled symbian - but missed the 'm' out :eek:

Don't try this at home - and DEFINITELY don't try it at work.

OC619

niknak
11th Feb 2010, 19:33
I googled symbian - but missed the 'm' out

Don't try this at home - and DEFINITELY don't try it at work.

That's a bit like labeling a red button "Do not press" and sure enough I pressed it...:eek::eek::eek:

Getting back to the original question, there's no doubt that question banks help you pass exams but they rarely increase the understanding of a particular subject.

Rocketraz
14th Feb 2010, 00:27
Airquiz is not a question bank... nor is PPLQUIZ..Im referring to somthing similar what the FAA release for student pilots in the USA but for the UK PPL the (acutal exam questions) from what i remember from when i was studying in the UK for my PPL no one published the exam questions, Could someone start a website ETC with feedback from candidates to start a question bank of real questions?????

Gertrude the Wombat
14th Feb 2010, 10:17
Could someone start a website ETC with feedback from candidates to start a question bank of real questions?????
Wouldn't it be better to actually learn the subjects rather than just memorise a set of questions and answers?

Especially if there's any danger of you one day flying around sharing the same sky as me?

IO540
14th Feb 2010, 11:10
The PPL Confuser gets pretty close to the real questions.

If you work through that enough times to consistently get 90%, you will have an easy time of the real exams.

And remember you only have to pass - you don't have to get 100% :)

90% of the PPL theory is irrelevant anyway. What matters is your attitude as a pilot, and how much personal interest you invest in flying to pick up the really useful information.

niknak
14th Feb 2010, 12:03
90% of the PPL theory is irrelevant anyway

If so, why is it still part of the training requirement?

Rocketraz
14th Feb 2010, 12:35
From what i can gather and talking to a few instructors in the US the newer UK JAR PPL exams are geared towards people that will go on to study at ATPL level not for the (Pleasure pilot) that sounds wrong :\

The reason i ask is that ive moved to the US with a new job :ok: i completed my FAA PPL and found the ground exam side far better as i had a groundschool then studied the question bank job done no problems..

When i was still living in the UK and studying for the UK JAR PPL i found i was learning a lot of irrelevant stuff. I did pass all my ground exams but would have liked to have had a better study tool than here say and the some times right some times wrong confuser

englishal
14th Feb 2010, 16:18
Learning the subject is far better, especially in FAA land where the examiner will grill you in the form of an Oral exam too.

I do think it is a little unfair to deliberately make questions ambiguous to catch people out.

For example (made up) have "Heading 335 degrees" and "Heading 353 degrees" in the same answer. That doesn't really test anyone as under pressure it is very easy to choose the wrong one even though you know the right answer.

Anyone know the British Standard number for JAA approved sunglasses? I'm sure a few ATPL'ers out there do....:cool::ugh:

IO540
14th Feb 2010, 16:32
If so, why is it still part of the training requirement?

Tradition, young man :)

We beat the Germans TWICE doing aviation the proper way, so if it was right for your grandfather and your father, it is definitely right for you, young man.

1800ed
14th Feb 2010, 17:14
90% of the PPL theory is irrelevant anyway. What matters is your attitude as a pilot, and how much personal interest you invest in flying to pick up the really useful information.So you're saying I don't need to know what colour flares I should be throwing out of the window of my aircraft when I get into problems?

Gertrude the Wombat
14th Feb 2010, 18:51
So you're saying I don't need to know what colour flares I should be throwing out of the window of my aircraft when I get into problems?
I went on a sailing holiday once.

It was mostly messing around in boats and drinking in tavernas, but there was also a little training.

Towards the end of the holiday we had a session on emergency procedures, including use of flares. "What flares," we asked. "The ones in a plastic bag tied to the front of the mast under the foredeck" they told us.

None of us had spotted them and none of us knew they were there.

Similarly I don't know where to find the flares in my rented 172 :)

IO540
14th Feb 2010, 19:01
The really useful knowledge is

- weather (how to get it off the internet, etc)
- mechanics of flying e.g. wing loading, stalls, etc
- aircraft systems (e.g. which CBs to pull if you smell smoke :) )
- engine management
- fuel management
- protocol crap e.g. how to get PPR/PNR, Customs, etc
- hand signals concerning parking (essential at bigger airports)
- hypoxia and how to get it
- how to use GPS
- how to use VOR/DME
- how to fly an ILS (yes I am talking about a PPL pilot; one day it might save his life)

and other stuff like that.

90% of the ground school is crap like ICAO convention date, the signals square, abstract weather stuff... and of course the stupid circular slide rule which no pilot who actually flies from A to B for real ever uses, but which takes up more ground school time than everything else put together.

Rocketraz
14th Feb 2010, 20:48
Quote:I do think it is a little unfair to deliberately make questions ambiguous to catch people out....

Thats the sort of thing im talking about all the ICAO stuff just takes up head space when other far more important things should be taught..