View Full Version : Is it reasonable to call her a bitch, or have I gone too far?


Loose rivets
3rd Oct 2009, 05:16
The dog that is. I was having a conversation with a lovely lady about dogs. She had a lovely bitch, and I told her that 'These two are dogs, and this is a bitch.' She looked as though she was going to swoon. I laughed, and said that the Queen of England would use the word for a female dog...but I didn't really know if her majesty, despite being a doggy person, really would.

I'm tired of people stealing words. It seemed to start with Gay. I remember a Times columnist saying what a shame it was, 'Such a happy little word'. Now it's lost forever.

Pussy. I really love our cat. She's called Kitty Park. I also hail her as Puss puss. or Puddy cat. Even in moments of determined resistance, I don't holla "Puuuuussy!" out into the neighborhood. They wouldn't understand, despite having watched endless Tom and Jerrys.

Beaver. What the heck did that little critter do wrong? It's interesting, and cute...well, sort of. How dare they say its name in vein?


Now, the worst conceivable misuse of a word. 'Mother'. It's a contraction of... well, you know. That - the full version - will not be heard in our house. Ever.



B Fraser
3rd Oct 2009, 07:12
An American chum once said "I'm going to lick your fanny" in polite company when he meant "I'm going to whoop your ass, kick butt etc." The smelling salts had to be passed around.

The word "Cootchie" gets a few giggles in Fraser Towers. Mrs Beef does however often sport a rather charming pearl necklace.

http://www.sandhillslave.com/storage/White_Freshwater_Pearl_Necklace.jpg

Wod
3rd Oct 2009, 07:49
Let's just persist with the usages we know.

I am with loose rivets , our language should not be hi-jacked. We can accommodate alternative meanings for alternative social situations, but we should not hesitate to use bitch or gay or queer appropriately in our own social environment.

The language is a live, evolving and accommodating thing. I'd hate to put in/out or taboo labels on words.

(Largely because I would always be half a lap behind)



Nice neck. Nice necklace.:E

G-CPTN
3rd Oct 2009, 08:00
I take it that you never refer to the male of the Gallus gallus domesticus (or any other fowl or aves)?

Next we will have to use the word spheroids in commentaries covering team games (and golf) . . .

And will we be allowed to refer to Canis lupus familiaris as d*gs?

Whirlygig
3rd Oct 2009, 08:06
Or as I once said to American colleague, "Can I bum a fag off you?" :}

Never understood why "bitch" (or even "cow" for that matter) is used to describe a rather unpleasant woman; both bitches and cows are actually quite sweet-natured.

Cheers

Whirls

Wod
3rd Oct 2009, 08:22
Irony, Whirls, irony.

Then again, if you heated your iron on the old wood fired range and slammed it into their foreheads, some of these people would never get irony.

I feel superior and more ejukated now.

It's Not Working
3rd Oct 2009, 08:47
Whirly

Try asking your American colleague for some Fairy Liquid!

radeng
3rd Oct 2009, 09:39
While Durex in Australia is what we call Sellotape and the Americans call Scotch tape. But the hijacking has gone too far......

I wonder what would be made in the US of a kid singing the nursery rhyme 'I love little pussy, her coat is so warm, and if I don't hurt her, she'll do me no harm'?

Matari
3rd Oct 2009, 11:17
Etymology is a fascinating subject.

Bitch goes back quite a while (http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?search=bitch&searchmode=none).


And then there is pussy (http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?search=pussy&searchmode=none).

x213a
3rd Oct 2009, 15:03
"I'm just nipping outside for a fag" always guarantees raised eyebrows with the cousins!

Loose rivets
3rd Oct 2009, 15:56
And then there's the things that we must learn to find new names for: Cock. Cock!! What Ball-valves. :rolleyes:



It's true. The good old Ballcock and stopcock are supposed to be renamed. Their packaging to sport the words valve instead. :ugh:

11Fan
3rd Oct 2009, 15:56
There's a name for ladies like you, but it isn't used in High Society.............outside of a kennel.




OK, who said it, and what movie?

ArthurBorges
3rd Oct 2009, 15:59
Shortly after starting an office job with a US company in Stockholm, a friend contracted a hoarse throat one morning and it took her several minutes to understand why every English speaking male was asking her how she was and then walking off bowled over in laughter.

Well, in English, you have a "frog in your throat"; in French it's a "cat" and in Swedish it's a 'rooster".

Asked "How are you?" by her colleagues, she replied with perfect fluency: "Fine, except for the c**k in my throat."

WhatsaLizad?
3rd Oct 2009, 16:09
"Or as I once said to American colleague, "Can I bum a fag off you?" http://images.ibsrv.net/ibsrv/res/src:www.pprune.org/get/images/smilies/badteeth.gif"

If I was in the UK standing with my typical US airline cabin crew, I would calmly reply, "take any of them". Same goes if you wanted to "bum a bitch off me too" :E

Ancient Observer
3rd Oct 2009, 16:19
I'm not sure that people on pprune are old enough to "take" any US crew members.

Moira
3rd Oct 2009, 16:25
OK, who said it, and what movie?

Joan Crawford - The Women :)

ArthurR
3rd Oct 2009, 16:46
radeng:
If we had have had Durex in the UK a few hundred years ago, it is quite possible there would be no Australia or USA

Krystal n chips
3rd Oct 2009, 17:03
In certain ahem, circles, when spelt with a capital "B" it can, I understand, be taken as the ultimate compliment...:E

chuks
3rd Oct 2009, 17:15
meaning "cheap, saving of money, economical..." a good old Anglo-Saxon word, got one poor civil servant in Washington, D.C. in so much hot water he lost his job over using it perfectly correctly. He finally made a truly cringe-worthy apology for using a word that could be misunderstood.

One night in the bar I was discussing poetry with our English Chief Pilot's wife when we came to "This Be The Verse" by the great modern English poet Philip Larkin. After I quoted the opening line he went slightly mad but I simply flashed my poetic licence and stoutly maintained that the word as used was not mine but Larkin's so argue with him except that he's dead, okay? I won that argument but was later passed over for an upgrade and I have always wondered why...

Basil
3rd Oct 2009, 18:12
chuks,
I was lucky that ol' skip didn't say anything after I informed a lady first class passenger that I was the Captain's sexual adviser.

She did ask for it a bit. After engaging skip in conversation for some time, as she left the flight deck, she asked me, as an afterthought and rather imperiously "And whatt doo yoo doo?"

When I enlarged upon the job description she exclaimed "Really!" and quickly left :)

hellsbrink
4th Oct 2009, 16:54
Niggardly


meaning "cheap, saving of money, economical..." a good old Anglo-Saxon word, got one poor civil servant in Washington, D.C. in so much hot water he lost his job over using it perfectly correctly. He finally made a truly cringe-worthy apology for using a word that could be misunderstood.


I remember that one well. Believe it or not, they ended up taking no action against him because he was gay

ExSp33db1rd
4th Oct 2009, 20:44
"........Try asking your American colleague for some Fairy Liquid!........."

or a Rubber ! ( Eraser to our American readers )

Rainboe
4th Oct 2009, 20:52
At hotel check in, I called across a crowded lobby of a hotel in San Francisco to the burly Flight Engineer 'I'll knock you up in the morning!'. It was for breakfast- wake him up, we go find somewhere to have breakfast. I had that sudden silent moment as you realise you've said something wrong, but don't know what, as 50 heads swivel around to look at you in astonishment, and all conversation ceases.

For the benefit of Limeys, I had apparently said in American 'I shall have endeavour to make you pregnant in the morning'. To a rotund flight engineer with 24 hour stubble.

birrddog
4th Oct 2009, 21:40
Rainboe, bare in mind where you said that (in which city)...

Another phrase to watch out for in the US, is "Lets hook up later"...

hookup, is apparently what you do, before you knock up as per Rainboe's description above...

rgbrock1
5th Oct 2009, 13:13
And let us not forget that "fanny pack" has an entirely different meaning for us Amerikans than it does for you inhabitants of "that island".

27mm
5th Oct 2009, 14:14
I mortified the assembled company at my daughter's wedding when I referred to her new husband in my speech as "...a good shag..." meaning a good bloke.....

Dushan
6th Oct 2009, 00:12
meaning ... but I simply flashed my poetic licence and stoutly maintained that the word as used was not mine...

Dou you really posses such a licence? How do we know that you are not just Walting here? What color triskelion is on your poetic licence?