View Full Version : Royal Mail Recorded Delivery - why bother?


jabird
14th Mar 2005, 20:56
Sent my brother's phone by recorded delivery on 7th Feb. Accept now that I should have sent it Special Delivery, but "£28 max value" sounded about right for what I believed was a well used payg phone without much credit.

I also thought that Recorded should be sufficient to ensure that it got to its destination, but oh no....

After about 1 week of wondering where it had got to, it turns out that Orange say the phone had been used, although fortunately not to make any long calls.

Royal Mail deny any responsibility, saying that Recorded Delivery is not "officially missing" until 15 days have expired. Brother gets crime reference number, but they still don't care.

15 days pass, and brother tries various emails to customer service, only to be told they can't read them because they can't open attachments (he didn't send one anyway).

Have just dug out original receipt, and get following info on their website:

"Recorded Signed Forô items are only tracked after the item has been delivered. Depending on whether the item was sent first or second class, this may be a few days after posting. Please try again later. Information on your item is not yet available online."

So what on earth is the point in recorded delivery in the first place? Looks like I am going to have to send anything I want confirmation for special delivery from now on, whether it is valuable or not.



Grainger
14th Mar 2005, 21:15
Gets worse jabird: I once sent an item by International Recorded Delivery.

When - inevitably - it went missing without a trace, I was told by an unrepentant soul at the Post Office that they only track the parcel as far as its point of departure from the UK.

I asked why I had wasted my money, since the service was neither "International", "Recorded", nor indeed "Delivery" - but the irony of the situation was completely lost on them :rolleyes:

Oshkosh George
14th Mar 2005, 22:45
I'm ex Royal Mail,and Recorded Delivery is not safeguarded in ANY way,it's just the same as every other item of mail,goes in the normal stream,and on reaching the delivery postmen,then goes on a card to obtain a signature.

If you want security,go for Special Delivery,or Registered. These go to a secure locker at both ends,and have their special dispatch methods. Having said that,these also used to travel on unattended/sometimes insecure guards vans on trains. Now that Royal Mail is mostly road/air transported,it is mostly accompanied too.

Maxflyer
14th Mar 2005, 23:22
The Royal Mail is a complete and utter waste of time and money. My Postman can't even speak English. They lose my mail on a regular basis and I now tell people not to use their service. I would rather pay for UPS or DHL to collect. At least I know it will get there.

If you try and ring the mail sorting office it is either permanently engaged or just rings forever.

It is time for the Royal Mail to have its monopoly completely removed.

CarltonBrowne the FO
15th Mar 2005, 00:16
Recorded Delivery is only useful if you think the recipient will deny ever having seen the item. I have had good experience with registered in the last few years; each item gets a consignment number, and there is a telephone number on the receipt which you can phone to check progress. Having said that, I've never HAD to use the number, everything I have sent that way has arrived in time! The record of the specialist carriers with my items, however, is no better than 50% on time to the right addressee...
maxflyer, I believe your wish is being granted next year; however, it is no more accurate to class all Royal Mail employees as lazy illiterates than to class all aircrew as irresponsible drunkards...

Jordan D
15th Mar 2005, 05:49
Whilst you lot all slag off Royal Mail, I ask you this: you take your letter, and see how far 28p will get you!

Jordan

Camilion
15th Mar 2005, 07:23
Totally agree with Grainger - brother sent a birthday card from the UK to the Middle East (no, not the trouble spot so no excuses there,) by International Recorded Delivery (turns out it's actually International Signed For service.) Card (in bigger envelope than card so doesn't look like a prime candidate for intercepting and having a gander at...) didn't appear for over a month.

After several calls and emails to the delightful Royal Mail back in the UK, was told that they can't trace it til it's missing for 28 days (which it was, and a trace was instigated) and haven't heard from them since. Can't track the card from this end cos RM have provided a 'Reference number' which is NOT an Airway bill number, therefore doesn't exist in any other country. Add to that the fact that they don't (hidden in the small print) track consignments once they leave the UK, i was surprised that i ever received the card at all.

Strangely, when i DID receive the card, BOTH of the stickers with the ref no on (that delivery men are supposed to take off and stick to their delivery lists - sorry, don't know the technical term for it - once the parcel has been accepted and SIGNED for) were STILL attached to the envelope... surely this means that the card is still, as yet, undelivered, as far as the RM are concerned??! :hmm:

eal401
15th Mar 2005, 08:33
Nowadays, anything of even slight value goes Special Delivery, even if it's just a box of chocs to Mum. Why? Because the Royal Mail is untrustworthy and unreliable.

So Jordan D, I don't just pay 28p, I willingly allow the Royal Mail to rip me off just to protect against their incompetence & their theiving posties.

allan907
15th Mar 2005, 08:45
Try weight for value. 28p gets a very lightweight envelope quite far. Now use the same value for your own weight and I suspect that one ought to be able to get to the moon and back.

However, the main point of this post is to slag off Australia Post. We've all heard the heartwarming tales of the envelope addressed to "The old bloke who lives next to the barking dog close to where you can hear the waves by a shipyard" and low and behold the good old trusted postie manages to get the missive delivered to Drapes.

Not so. I've just had a letter to Holden returned marked "Unknown" because I omitted ONE number from the PO box - I wrote 174 instead of 1774. Now, Holden is a fecking big organisation in this part of the world - equivalent to Ford of Dagenham. There is only one Holden in Melbourne. So how come Mr Smartypants Postie can't recognise where the fecking envelope was supposed to go? Or is the staff of the Melbourne sorting office composed entirely of 'jobsworths'? And while I recognise that automatic sorting occurs with phosphorous bar codes and things, the bloody "Return to Sender' notice is handwritten :mad: :mad: :*

jayteeto
15th Mar 2005, 08:51
Recorded delivery works for me!! If I want to prove a letter has arrived, I have it recorded. Great when complaining, posting ebay items etc.

eal401
15th Mar 2005, 09:05
allen907, I have had much worse than that. I used to regularly get post for someone whose street name was vaguely similar, but the name was completely different and in a different postcode. One letter I reposted, highlighting the postcode only to get it back the following day!

My parents live at no. 44 and regularly get mail for no. 43, 42, 40, 38 and a completely different street.

Maxflyer
15th Mar 2005, 09:09
maxflyer, I believe your wish is being granted next year; however, it is no more accurate to class all Royal Mail employees as lazy illiterates than to class all aircrew as irresponsible drunkards...

...didn't actually suggest that all employees were illiterate. Merely pointed out that my Postman cannot speak English! As for branding all flight crew as drunkards?

Do you write for the tabloids?

Navajo8686
15th Mar 2005, 09:25
It was once said on the radio that the best way of guarenteeing that a letter or package will be delivered is to not put any stamps on it.

It gets special treatment all the way through the system so that the postal delivery executive (not allowed to call them postmen and postwomen now I expect) can collect the missing money on delivery.

Don't know if it's true or an urban myth.

Standard Noise
15th Mar 2005, 12:08
I can testify to it being true, due to a mother in law who put a first class stamp on a packet which weighed over 120 grams - I had to pay the difference and by christ, the PO weren't slow in putting a card through my letterbox letting me know they were holding it to ransom, so they could get their cash, natch.

But when I sent a job application off for Mrs Noise with 'signed for', a few months back, as soon as they got the cash, they lost the letter!!! w:mad: nkers!

As for Special Delivery, they lost my late father's death certificate 4 years ago when it was sent SD. So it appears that no matter what service (or should that be price?) you pay for, they are still giving the normal crappy service.

lexxity
15th Mar 2005, 12:23
The royal mail are an absolute disgrace, we regularly have our post dropped in from 3, 2, 30, 34 and 36 on our road. We are 32. I actually recieved a recorded delivery item last week, now here's the interesting thing, my postie knocked on the outside door so quietly (there is a proper door knocker) that even my dogs didn't hear him and I only thought I'd heard something! I saw a glimpse of orange heading off up the drive and ran to the door to see if he wanted something signing. Sure enough, there is the recorded delivery item lying on my doormat, with the sticker removed that has to be attached to the "signed for" card. So obviously Mr postie has taken the liberty of forging my signature! I despair of the royal mail, they are so slow it's not even funny. UPS are a much better bet, I had some documents sent to me from Virginia, USA, I tracked it to the point of arriving at my door and it took two days from start to finish, so why does it take 10 days for an item to travel 10miles, with the good old royal mail? ARGHHH:{

BALIX
15th Mar 2005, 12:38
Have actually recieved a 'Signed For' package here that had indeed been signed for - by the postie... At least we got it, but it wasn't really the point. :\

Another thing - received the notification of a package the other day - it hadn't been delivered as we weren't in and there was a customs charge to pay. On picking it up at the local sorting office, it turns out that the £9-53 charge consisted of £5-53 to HM Customs and Excise and £4 to the post office for "Presenting the package to HM Customs, paying the charge behalf of the recipient and collecting the money from said recipient".

Nice little earner for the Post Office, dontcha think??? :(

jabird
15th Mar 2005, 14:39
"Whilst you lot all slag off Royal Mail, I ask you this: you take your letter, and see how far 28p will get you!

Jordan"

Jordan - that is precisely the problem! 28p is far too cheap relative to the value of the service provided, but it is a big taboo subject to talk about putting prices up, and even more so to use the P word.

However, I paid extra for recorded delivery, knowing it is not the same as special, but at least expecting to be able to get confirmation of whether or not it had been delivered. As said earlier, it was not recorded, and it certainly wasn't delivered!

Against the trades' description act me thinks, but no doubt RM are outside its remit.

Enought about the problem though - what is the solution? Privatisation is fine if it can be opened up to competition, but is this realistic?